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Author Topic: Lá Fhéile Pádraig Sona Daoibh  (Read 305 times)

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Offline Cuchculan

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Lá Fhéile Pádraig Sona Daoibh
« on: March 17, 2014, 06:33:58 AM »
To all our members a very happy St. Patrick's Day from Dublin Ireland. Hope you all have a Green Day wherever you live !!!!!!!
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The Lovable Irish Rogue

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Re: Lá Fhéile Pádraig Sona Daoibh
« Reply #1 on: March 18, 2014, 03:11:17 PM »
Oh dear, i overlooked this thread when it mattered (yesterday)! Better late by a day than never though i guess. :winking0008: Wishing you and others a happy St Patrick's Day. Its great that its become such an international day thats celebrated around the world with such positivity. Our world could do with more days like that which bring people together for the right reasons.

Gaelic always sounds like a beautiful language, particularly when sung (i have an interview on DVD with Enya where she's speaking in Gaelic with scenery filmed from her birthplace of Galway, Ireland). I guess its as good an excuse as any to break out one of her albums and give it a listen to tonight! :happy0158: Maybe even catch some Father Ted if i'm lucky!

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Offline tinam7

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Re: Lá Fhéile Pádraig Sona Daoibh
« Reply #2 on: March 19, 2014, 07:30:13 AM »
Do we speak Gaelic? Maybe we should learn. They say learning a new language is good for the old bean.

Anyway, the Irish took over. Even rivers turned green on Monday. I'm not Irish but wore green mainly because it goes with my green eyes and is a favorite color. It was a lovely day. Decided to become daring and search for Samuel Beckett.
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Offline Cuchculan

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Re: Lá Fhéile Pádraig Sona Daoibh
« Reply #3 on: March 19, 2014, 07:52:17 AM »
Is it a recognised EU language. To have that happen a certain amount of people in the country must speak it. I know a certain amount only. Enough to get by on were I live. Were it not used at all. Just a few of us may greet each other and say hope you have a good day and the likes in Gaelic. The very basics.
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Offline tinam7

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Re: Lá Fhéile Pádraig Sona Daoibh
« Reply #4 on: March 20, 2014, 07:55:25 AM »
Is there also a Scottish version of Gaelic? It has these accents, maybe like Umlauts in German. Interesting.
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Re: Lá Fhéile Pádraig Sona Daoibh
« Reply #5 on: March 20, 2014, 08:34:26 AM »
Yes, they have a common ancestor but there are slight differences. :winking0008: I don't know alot about Gaelic, but the place i live is in Gaelic and we have a hell of a time giving out our address because of it! ::) We have to spell every word letter by letter.

From my limited grasp, Scots Gaelic is a bit more like 'French' than its Irish counterpart; it doesn't pronounce hard sounds. For instance, in Irish Gaelic the city of Dublin is spoken to sound as it is - in Scots gaelic it would be pronounced 'Doo-lin'. We would drop the hard 'b' sound. Like French, Scots Gaelic likes harmony and flow. But both mean the same thing in English (Black-pool). Somebody correct me if i'm wrong! :laugh3:

Where i live in Scotland, in ancient times they spoke Pictish, not Gaelic. It never made it to written form as far as the experts know and it died out. Some academics think it would have been closer to modern-day Welsh, though nobody can be sure. All thats left of the Picts are ancient standing stones they carved with symbols and decoration which litter the North-East of Scotland. Unlike the Celts who favoured ornate swirl designs, the Picts enjoyed depicting animals. I remember i seen a pretty one once where they'd carved a deer with its calf sheltering between its legs. Sweet.

Sorry, am delving off topic here...

 
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Offline Cuchculan

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Re: Lá Fhéile Pádraig Sona Daoibh
« Reply #6 on: March 20, 2014, 10:39:36 AM »
When in Scotland I did buy a Scottish gaelic dictionary and founds the words to be so much different. Here in Ireland up in the North it is also different. But we can understand the different dialect. There are four main areas in Ireland were the language is used. Each is slightly different. In school I had a Northern Irish teacher an oddly he taught us more Northern Gaelic that Southern gaelic. But it was still accepted in the exams. One thing that does overlap between Ireland and Scotland is tales / mythology. That I did find. The same version of various mythological beings in each country with different origins.  Odd you should mention Dublin. It began as an Irish word. There was a place called Dubh Linn just off the liffey. Black pool as you mentioned. Over the years it turned into an English word with a newer spelling and a newer gaelic form for it. Baile Atha Cliath. Dubh Linn was part of the river Liffey.  Dubh here would actually sound like Dove and Linn would sound like the female name Lynn. The background in both countries is interesting.
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The Lovable Irish Rogue

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Re: Lá Fhéile Pádraig Sona Daoibh
« Reply #7 on: March 20, 2014, 11:32:47 AM »
There's an old Disney film i remember we'd watch when i was a kid, called "Darby O' Gill And The Little People" set in Ireland about an old man whom everything thinks is mad, his daughter, a newly arrived guy who falls for her (Sean Connery), and a Leprechaun. :laugh3: I always remember near the end where a wailing Banshee arrives when the old man's daughter is dying. My grandmother was an elderly woman who in her youth was brought up by her gyspy family in the Highlands of Scotland travelling around in horse drawn wagons (she was the last to experience that life), and she genuinely believed in all that ghost stuff. We enjoyed teasing her about it being silly and getting her agitated. Her father was also Highland Scottish but he spent alot of his life in Ireland for some reason. She used to call what's commonly known as the Banshee 'the washer woman' and when other family members would joke about her unexpected long life coming to an end soon she'd say 'you'll have me seeing the washer woman next." :laugh3: The other day recently i read online that 'the washer woman' is the Scots English name for essentially the same thing in Irish mythology called the Banshee.

It is interesting. :winking0008: My sister has a few chunky books on Celtic/Irish/Scottish mythology on a shelf in her room... i've looked at the covers and read the introductions, but little else as of yet! My university had quite a well funded Gaelic language department attached to it which was quite popular. Even Europeans like Germans and Scandinavians studied there. The area i live has the 'Dubh' part in its name like Dubh Linn. We all around here pronounce it 'Doo'. Thats why we also have to spell that part for people too (usually over the phone) every time we give out our location. ::)

Dialects in languages are always interesting... i remember reading about different German dialects recently. Even my dialect is different from that of Glaswegians in my own country, and i don't always understand them! :fragend005: :laugh3:

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Offline Cuchculan

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Re: Lá Fhéile Pádraig Sona Daoibh
« Reply #8 on: March 20, 2014, 02:48:33 PM »
Darby O Gill and the little people. A fine film for sure. Still have a copy of it here. Lot of films made in Ireland back then. The Quiet man with John Wayne. Famous scene of your man dying in that film. The priest in there giving him the last rites and someone sticks their head in the door and says there's a fight in the villiage. The dying man jumps out of bed, on with the trousers and out the door to watch the fight.  :laugh3:

You have many variations of the Banshee in various cultures. ***** of death. Comes in all shapes and forms. Go to any country in the world that has a good folklore background and you will find similar. Another thing that interests me are Faery mounds and Faery trees. We still have farmers afraid to dig up such trees for fear of cursing their family. They will plough around the tree. Rather than risk chopping it down. Of interest here was one such tree and a road been built. They knocked the tree down. They were warned that the stretch of road would be cursed. Laughed it off. In the first three months there were ten deaths on that stretch of road. People were starting to take notice. Now came the second road. Same thing. A Faery tree. This time at a cost of an million or so they built around the tree. They were afraid to take it up. Just shows that if your mind has something set within, no matter what, it will always believe in it, no matter how silly it might seem. Faery mounds are all over Ireland too. It is said Faery people are buried here. People are afraid to disturb them. Again they would rather work around them. Leaving them in one piece. So some customs do still remain strong in rural Ireland.
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The Lovable Irish Rogue

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Re: Lá Fhéile Pádraig Sona Daoibh
« Reply #9 on: March 21, 2014, 09:59:42 AM »
I seen Darby O Gill and the little people last year, the first time in many years. It was nostalgic in a way because it reminded me of my grandmother. I thought about looking to see if i could find a copy cheap on DVD! :laugh3: The Quiet Man was one of her favourite movies - the first movie she ever bothered to get on VHS, then i think she acquired a few more of his movies. She was a bit of a fan of his. Yep i remember the old man recieving the last rites then springing to life once more when he hears the fight is on - the old guy with the long grey beard who remembered Thornton's grandfather. :laugh3: My favourite moment is probably when they take time out from the fight to have a drink, and neither will allow the other to pay for the drinks; then after Wayne asks the barman for the time he sends Danaher crashing through the door with one mighty punch to resume the contest!

Was curious about Faery mounds and trees yesterday so i looked them up. :winking0008: I remember seeing a Neil Oliver series on ancient Britain and the man made mounds there were pretty impressive. The closest thing we have to those where i live are stone circles - there are loads of them where i live. They're not as grand as anything in Ireland or the Ring of Brodgar on Orkney though. Its their sheer concentration in our area thats interesting to people. On the road we pass them often, because locals wouldn't do away with them due to the superstition that it would bring about serious misfortune to do so. Farmers leave them be and allow long grass to grow around them (near my house they do anyway). The myth goes that those responsible for removing any of the stones will meet an unfortunate death! There's a real life story of that happening to a Victorian farmer who laughed off the myth and began carting the stones away... i believe he ended up being crushed by his own cart or something due to his horse being very nervous whenever it passed the stones. That confirmed the myth for locals, and now in recent decades the rings have started to be maintained and preserved rather than just benignly left alone. I do get the impression though that old customs have remained stronger in rural Ireland than they have here.
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Offline Cuchculan

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Re: Lá Fhéile Pádraig Sona Daoibh
« Reply #10 on: March 23, 2014, 07:52:16 AM »
One thing I love about both traditions / cultures is the Cairns. I know they can found all over the world these days. But way back when they were meant to have been made by Clans going off to fight. Each fighter would place a rock on the Cairn. More for protection. When they returned, if they returned, they each removed a rock. Good Gaelic saying ' Cuiridh mi clach air do chàrn, "I'll put a stone on your cairn". More a blessing to protect the Clans men. The stones that remained when the fighters returned were turned into a full size Cairn to remember the dead. Sort of history that interests me big time. Here in Ireland we have , Dún Aonghasa, an all-stone Iron Age Irish hill fort on Inishmore in the Aran Islands. It is still surrounded by small cairns and strategically placed jutting rocks, used collectively as an alternative to defensive earthworks because of the karst landscape's lack of soil. They still play a role even today.
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Re: Lá Fhéile Pádraig Sona Daoibh
« Reply #11 on: March 25, 2014, 11:21:28 AM »
Oh, i never knew that little ancient story about the Cairns. :winking0008: If we head out from where we live on the main road we pass one on top of a tall hill, and staring at it i've sometimes asked how it got there. Deep down, i prefer keeping it a mystery rather than spoiling it with facts!

If we head out the other way toward the city, then we get to admire Bennachie, where, on the top of Mither Tap, is an Iron Age fort. Its a distinctive low lying mountain (its called a hill but many will tell you it isn't really) because its flat on top. I remember going up there as a child. Since then its got its own visitors centre and all sorts of Visit Scotland stuff. Excavations have revealed a decent sized community living there for quite a long period, for many centuries most likely. Its also surrounded by ancient standing stones. It all dominates the skyline, and when my ex first seen it she was well impressed with the scenery and it as the backdrop.

I came across these reviews of it on a website about this sort of thing... having grown up with it always around me in some form or another whenever i head on a journey, it strikes me how odd it is these people find it so special! :laugh3:

http://www.themodernantiquarian.com/site/7508/mither_tap.html

The Iron Age fort on the Aran Islands looks so isolated! Who was fighting way out there enough to need a fort to protect themselves!? :laugh3: Then again, judging by the hill forts dotted around Ireland and Scotland i get the impression we tended to a spirited bunch who enjoyed a good fight, heh!

The ancient Irish though get to claim one speciality which they introduced us to though... gold artwork. The Celts from Ireland who settled on the west coast introduced to the peoples on this side of the water amazing artwork skills in gold smithing which rival anything the Romans ever produced. In fact it were the Irish Celts who converted us stubbornly Pagan Picts to Christianity, lol. :angel-smiley-006:

I often wonder about the linguistics... i'd really like to know if Pictish was similar to Gaelic. Did the two sides easily understand each other? Picts and Celts often fought each other, but then again they often fought amongst themselves and at times of crisis (usually external enemies such as Vikings or tribes from farther south) they seemed able to come together. Some say Pictish would have been similar to ancient Welsh but others say it may have been an even older language on the British Isles. Its a pity they never once developed writing so that they could have bequeathed us something that was written down with it for us to see and know.

I like how Ireland seems to have retained more of its Gaelic heritage than we have... more of our places are named using later Anglo-Scots terms loosely based on the Gaelic original, or sometimes make absolutely no sense because they poorly copied the sound of the original Gaelic name without bothering to learn what it actually meant.



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Offline Cuchculan

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Re: Lá Fhéile Pádraig Sona Daoibh
« Reply #12 on: March 25, 2014, 02:51:24 PM »
Don't forget that the Celts were not the first people here. So the Pictish language was also said to be used in Ireland before Gaelic. Fair to say we belong to a warrior race of people. If I do recall the film Centurion it was the so called Pictish language been used in that film. The Romans were afraid to travel too far North because of the Warriors. But a few had to to reclaim something stolen from the Romans. The Pictish were brought across as a somewhat untamed warrior race of people. They used subtitles in the film. But some words I could understand. I would guess they were using a fair bit of Gaelic mixed with some other language to bring about this new language for the film. Here in Ireland we had the Gaels. We also had this odd bunch of people called an fir blog. The Fir Blog I would say is pure myth. The story behind them is that they were meant to be slaves in Greece of all places. On an island. They stitched their water sacks together and escaped. Somehow ending up in Ireland. Little bit over the top if you ask me. Sweet story all the same.

On the Islands on the West Coast of Ireland is a shell of an old, well, not church as such, but a place were monks used to live. It is one amazing structure. The way they built it into the hills. This small island would get lashed out of it by Atlantic winds. It is not a place anybody lives on today. It would have been hand made. I simply couldn't even imagine people been able to build anything like it today. I think those sort of skills are long since lost. Irish TV used to try and film old ways of living when TV first came out. Programme called Hands. Might be able to find it on you tube. Skilled workers doing things by hand. No machines. Amazing watching them work. Lived a simple life and were happy as they were.

#Invalid YouTube Link#
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