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Offline NeverAgain2

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Re: gall bladder
« Reply #10 on: January 10, 2014, 12:55:19 AM »
BTW, last I checked I was a man, and my gallbladder has now gone on to gallbladder heaven (or hell), and was removed almost five years ago.  Prior to that I had noticed that I had had a large lump growing just below my ribs.  My quack doc a few years prior (2007) had poked around and said it was nothing.  I didn't have typical gallbladder symptoms, only one killer attack that sent me to the ER to have it removed just before bursting. So men do get gallbladder problems.

The above was meant just to say that as I grew more obsessed with the infected and swollen gallbladder in my gut, which I thought was a hernia of some type, I developed a really healthy anxiety and the muscles in my upper back tightened like a rock, only I didn't know it.  I only felt the effects in the front.  My entire upper back, especially the right side, felt like a solid piece of concrete.  The gallbladder came out, and yet I was still having that stiffness and pain in the upper front, so I went to physical therapy. In a matter of weeks the pain and stiffness were gone.

But...the anxiety was not.  I had had an anxiety problem all my life, but really didn't realize it.  The doc and PT said that if I tightened my stomach muscles all would be fine.  And it was, until I ran right back into life's problems; then it all came back, the stiffness in my torso and the pain in my chest and side.  Long story short, it was all anxiety, but I went from doc to doc, and got all kinds of dx's.  Finally, I had an MRI, and it showed a herniated disc mid-back, and I was relieved -- until I started to read how horrible that was. 

Look the story gets worse, then gets better.  But I had to get past all the doc's saying i MIGHT have this or that, or that my back "problem" was the worse thing that could ever happen and I would have to live with the pain.  Don't cough, the doc's told me, or fall down, because I could end up paralyzed because of my back "problem".  Turns out everybody over the age of 20 has disc abnormalities.   

Finally, I knew from my own research that it was anxiety, but this "right-sided pain" is a problem that is all over the internet, and with the exception of those who have something organically wrong with them, or who realize that it is anxiety, these people suffer and decline and end up on med after med.

Accept the anxiety illness if all your tests are negative  Work to find peace, and do not fear any strange symptoms, as they may be distressing but are not dangerous, but are reactions to the stress of everyday living and a poor reaction to those stresses over a lifetime.

Sorry to be so long-winded, but I was clueless for a very long time, and confused, and came damned close to wanting to drive my car into a bridge abutment.  Why?  Because I did not get the right diagnosis.  That diagnosis was anxiety.

Believe!
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Offline n50plic

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Re: gall bladder
« Reply #11 on: January 10, 2014, 05:16:33 PM »
You really put things in perspective. I've had my most symptom free day in a month. Its actually amazes me how much of the symptoms were just anxiety. I truly believed i was dying the other day and today its like noyhis ever happened at all. I think its time to focus more on my mental health. Thank you so much for sharing some of your past experiences and for forcing me to realize that its more nerves than anything else

-Nick-
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Offline NeverAgain2

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Re: gall bladder
« Reply #12 on: January 10, 2014, 06:27:50 PM »
I learned the hard way that mental health is a business and not a game.

Check into the work of Abraham Low MD.  He was a psychiatrist who wrote several books.  I'd urge you to get them from the foundation that carries on his work, and maybe even join Recovery International.  Google Abraham Low.  His books were published sixty years ago, right before the idea came that anxiety and depression were totally the result of chemical imbalance in the brain and after the ideas of Freud of everything stemming from childhood trauma.   Low established, essentially, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and peer support with Recovery International.  One of his mantras was that a case may be "helpless" but not "hopeless" and that it is the minor things in life and of course the major things in life that build to create the "nervous" patient. Take some patience and stay with the books.  The first time I read them I totally missed the point of what the case examples of small trivial things were having to do with Big Anxiety.  Well, from small anxiety and bad reactions to it comes Big Anxiety.

Good luck to you.  Be glad you didn't get lost in the doctor go round and began a fear of your symptoms.  Once there it is very hard to think rationally.
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