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Offline justliving

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New Here
« on: August 27, 2013, 05:20:11 PM »
Hello everyone, I'm new to the forum and just saying hello.  I suffer from
 childhood PTSD.  I'm 36 - I felt I had moved past my trauma.  I just kept living my life despite the fact I felt anxiety and depression pretty much every step of the way.  However, cr*p has happened in my life that has been extremely stressful and I have not been able to handle it.  I ended up leaving an extremely stressful job about 14 months ago.  Had a quiet 13 months for the most part - but now back into moderately stressful situations at work and I am struggling to manage everything.  I joined last Friday, because I experienced a stressful situation that would cause most people minor stress - however for me, I almost got to the point where I couldn't speak and I was shaking four or five hours later. 

Trying to figure out the best way to continue living my life and move past my childhood trauma - I don't want to get stuck in the past and dwell on being a victim.  I just want to live my life. 
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Offline Abraham2007

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Re: New Here
« Reply #1 on: August 27, 2013, 06:11:55 PM »
Trying to figure out the best way to continue living my life and move past my childhood trauma - I don't want to get stuck in the past and dwell on being a victim.  I just want to live my life.

I share your philosophy.  I'm aware the past is over - especially if it's around my childhood, since I'm in my late thirties - however, my biology still gets into deep anxiety where I don't have control over its reactions.  I'm embarrased to admit I have generalized anxiety disorder,  which is a form of PTSD, however it was harder to accept it is an issue I will deal with for life.  Meaning, since I was anxious prone as a child, and based on what I've learned from other people who have GAD, as we get older, it will never go away.

I don't know if you have had any success with medications, since I'm aware it can be daunting to find the find the right combination for anxiety.  But I've bit the bullet and accepted that I'll be on medication for life - not because I can't shift my thinking around situations and be less reactive - instead it's due to my biology cannot outgrow it's entrenched patterns of resistance that cause my anxiety levels to go up.  The best way to control it for me is biologically, not congitively in how I change my thinking patterns, but in how my body manages serotonin levels in my system.

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Offline justliving

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Re: New Here
« Reply #2 on: August 28, 2013, 12:59:04 AM »
Hey Abraham, I have tried meds.  I actually started writing a description of my experience with meds  - but my computer froze and I lost it.  Don't feel like writing it again.  LOL. 

So, long, long story short.  Meds were a very short term fix that didn't work for me in the longer term.  I tried a cocktail of a bunch of different meds with a bunch of different combinations.  Nothing worked.  Again, long story short - I had to quit my very stressful job.  Which left me without insurance. I still don't have insurance sooooo,

I've been trying to find new ways to deal with my anxiety.  I'm trying meditation, yoga, Reiki, and therapy.  I don't know if this is going to work either.  But at this point.  I feel I am out of options - and I have to try something. 

These alternative methods have helped to an extent.  February of this year my anxiety was so bad I was having constant anxiety that someone was after me.  I wanted to hide in my room all day.  I forced myself to get out.  The stress of being out in the world would wipe me out by the end of the day.  This is no way to live.  So, thats when I started trying different things.  At this point my anxiety is still really bad - but I can sort of get by, sort of.  I am hoping to continue making progress - and hope to find a job (sooner than later) that will offer me medical benefits.  And I will go and seek professional help. 
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Offline Abraham2007

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Re: New Here
« Reply #3 on: August 28, 2013, 01:44:21 AM »
 
Quote
So, long, long story short.  Meds were a very short term fix that didn't work for me in the longer term.  I tried a cocktail of a bunch of different meds with a bunch of different combinations.  Nothing worked. 

Do you mind me asking what medications you've tried?  I assumed they were antidepressants?  Also were you working with a general practitioner or a psychiatrist when diagnosing the appropriate medication?  Also when you say different combinations, do you mean one SSRI and a benzo, or a combo of a SSRI and another antidepressant?   And to add to my list of interrogating questions (smile), did you know the mg of each medication you were on.  Meaning did the doctor try to gradually build you up on the medication, and work with you about this build up process?   And did you have a good relationship with your doctor, where he was willing to work with you on finding a suitable medication that would work for your  anxiety disorder?

I'm also surprised that you never found temporary relief through a benzophanine, since they can offer temporary relief for at least a 24 hour period.

Quote
Again, long story short - I had to quit my very stressful job.  Which left me without insurance. I still don't have insurance sooooo,
p
Yes, I've been there.  When I was under my GAD, as it was activated I had to leave a job, and it was very painful for me since I knew I could do a good job in the position, but the activated anxiety really affected my cognitive ability to function properly.  I actually did use COBRA for a few months, until I found another position, but I'm aware the price may be a bit steep, monthly.

As a suggestion, have you researched online for alternatives to pay for medical services in your area?  There are psychiatrists that offer payments for a sliding scale.  And there are universities that provide treatments through psychiatric students (under the supervision of a trained psychiatrist), which could give you a prescription.   Wallmart has discounts on the major brands of antidepressants in the event you were prescribed a SSRI. And normally every state has a psychiatric center that takes applicants without insurance.  I live in the Northern VA area, and there is a center that caters to people without medical insurance.  They have a psychiatrist on staff that can write prescriptions, and work with you to find the appropriate medication.

So, where I am getting at, with a bit of persistence, you can always get around your current set back of no insurance via your job.  And if you're experiencing the s*itty effects of anxiety - because I know the hell it can put someone through, if not put under control - it may motivate you, or basically force you, to find a way to alleviate the symptoms as soon as possible.

Quote
I've been trying to find new ways to deal with my anxiety.  I'm trying meditation, yoga, Reiki, and therapy.  I don't know if this is going to work either.  But at this point.  I feel I am out of options - and I have to try something. 
These alternative methods have helped to an extent. 

I've tried about every alternative therapy you can think of from meditation, yoga, energy medicine, emotional freedom technique, herbs, acupuncture, emdr, hypnosis, body work, cranio sacro therapy, self help philosophies, prayer, cbt, and a few others.   Like you, I was desperate to find an alternative, natural method to cure my anxiety for good, but despite all those alternative therapies, my anxiety always came back at a later time.   I would experience temporary relief from alternative therapies, but not long lasting relief.

So I had to accept that my anxiety would never be cured, but it could at least be managed.

Quote
February of this year my anxiety was so bad I was having constant anxiety that someone was after me.  I wanted to hide in my room all day.  I forced myself to get out.  The stress of being out in the world would wipe me out by the end of the day.  This is no way to live.  So, thats when I started trying different things.  At this point my anxiety is still really bad - but I can sort of get by, sort of.  I am hoping to continue making progress - and hope to find a job (sooner than later) that will offer me medical benefits.  And I will go and seek professional help.

I have similar symptoms when I'm not on medication.  I take a high dose of Zoloft, and it is controlling the symptoms of agoraphobia and obsessive compulsive disorder.  My anxiety, when triggered, doesn't make any sense logically, and I know it doesn't.  But it has made me terrified of living in my own home, paranoid about neighbors,  or obsessing about things which an outsider would find a non-relevant issue.   Now I'm a well educated guy, went to college, works a well paying job, owns a home, so I seem stable, however when my GAD gets triggered I transform from what you would call a lion into a pansy.  I wish I could control this, but it's been difficult to do this with sheer will power, and often impossible.  My best solution has been to find the right medicine that manages an anxiety disorder, and like I wrote earlier, it can take several attempts to find a medication that works with your system.

After years of resistance to medications, and several tries on different antidepressants and antipsychotics, I finally found a mediation that worked with my system, without major side effects, to manage my anxiety.   So where I'm getting at is that it can take several tries to find the right medication to work with you in dealing with an anxiety disorder.

There are people on this board who have tried every SSRI and SNRI, until they finally came to the realization that a tryclic would work with them.    So, although it is a pain in the 0104 to go this route, many people who suffer GAD or PTSD know the lengthy ordeal to find an appropriate medication for their anxiety, given there are many medications to choose from.   None are better or worse to an individual, but one or two would probably be most beneficial to a user.  A trained psychiatrist could shorten the time period in finding the right combo, since they have a good familiarity with antidepressants and how they can cure mental health issues.

This post may sound like I'm pushing medication on you, instead I'm just giving you my history, since I've been where you're going through.

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Offline justliving

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Re: New Here
« Reply #4 on: August 28, 2013, 03:40:35 PM »
Hey Abraham, thanks for posting up all the information.  I was not aware of most of it. 

As for the cocktail of meds I was on.  I don't know.  My doctor and I tried for six months to get it straightened out.  I would go in every few weeks or so to adjust this, change that, put me on something different.  As for what I was on - I couldn't even tell you. 

But here is the long story short.  I would take my cocktail of meds at the prescribed times.  Feel absolutely amazing!! (By the way - off topic, have you ever seen the movie "Limitless" - this is how I felt.)  I would feel limitless! Taking thse meds.  Felt amazing.  But then within a short 10 to 15 minute window I would crash.  (the meds would last anywhere between 4 and 6 hours - and all of a suddent I would go from feeling amazing - to feeling horrid).  The crash was horrific.    Another tangent - I have a high metabolism (I weigh about 185 pounds - 14% body fat - but eat anywhere between 3,000 and 4,5000 calories a day).  I'm pretty sure my body was metabolizing the meds quickly and then crashing and burning. 

The crash and burn effect was horrible.  For the first time in my life I started having flashbacks of childhood trauma.  I started convulsing and going fetal.  One time the convulsions were so strong that vessels in my eyes popped and it looked like I had two black eyes for several days  :(  pretty lame. 

Also, waking up completely panic attacked in the middle of the night was horrid.  Would go to sleep feeling fine.  Wake up absolutely panicked over nothing.  Have to take some more pills and wait for them to kick in.  While I paced around the room completely fixated on taking a fatal dose of ibuprofin.  I didn't even want to ***** - I just couldn't stop thinking about sucking down a whole bottle of pills.  It was horrid. 

Like I said - this went on for six months before I said I had enough.  I know other people have tried for much longer to figure out their proper doses.  But I didn't have much time left.  Literally.  I was seriously afraid I was going to ***** on one of these crashing and burning episodes.  I had my brother there for me - we used to live together.  I would wake him up in the middle of the night while I would pace around the room to make sure i didn't suck down a bottle of pills. 

The major stress in my life was my job - I made a decision I could hold out until a specific date and then come hell or high water I was quiting.  I desperately tried to find a new job.  Nothing.  The date came.  I quit.  Pretty much flushed my career down the drain.  I filed bankruptcy not too long ago and now I am rebuilding.  It sucks.  But it happens. 

You had asked some other questions - the person prescribing me these meds was my primary care physician.  Probably not the best person to go to for these types of matters.  I was new to this - I didn't know any better. 

As for the alternative methods - that sucks they didn't work for you.  And you seem to have tried everything :( 

I've been doing some research in what the military is doing for our soldiers coming back from the middle east.  Many of them are showing signs of PTSD.  And there have been record ***** rates of returning military vets.  The government started researching methods of coping with PTSD.  They have been researching different medications, therapy, group therapy, acupuncture, herbal supplements, and so on.  I can't remember the book that I read that covered this research - I've been reading a lot about PTSD and anxiety.  Trying to figure out how I'm going to live with this. 

Still don't have all the answers.  Probably never will.  Just trying to live my life. 
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Offline Abraham2007

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Re: New Here
« Reply #5 on: August 28, 2013, 06:41:28 PM »
Hi justliving -

Quote
Hey Abraham, thanks for posting up all the information.  I was not aware of most of it. 

You mentioned doing quite a bit of research on PTSD.  In your research, you'll come across all the terms and suggestions I mentioned in terms of treatment.

Just fyi, before I took my anxiety disorder seriously, I was fairly clueless on what generalized anxiety disorder or PTSD was.  I didn't take it seriously, because I thought I could overcome it with my will and determination, until it negatively impacted my life.   So I learned a lot about anxiety disorders, as my own personal way to manage my own health.

Quote
As for the cocktail of meds I was on.  I don't know.  My doctor and I tried for six months to get it straightened out.  I would go in every few weeks or so to adjust this, change that, put me on something different.  As for what I was on - I couldn't even tell you. 

Were you diagnosed with an anxiety disorder, when you met with your doctor?  It sounds as if you were diagnosed more with issues about  high blood pressure from overwhelming stress, since you mentioned ibuprofin.  Anxiety disorders deal more with the brain and the nervous system, so it's a different part of the body that needs to be treated, from a medical standpoint.

I've also learned to not follow a doctor, or any therapist, blindly, when prescribed medication or alternative treatment.

Quote
But here is the long story short.  I would take my cocktail of meds at the prescribed times.  Feel absolutely amazing!! (By the way - off topic, have you ever seen the movie "Limitless" - this is how I felt.)  I would feel limitless! Taking thse meds.  Felt amazing.  But then within a short 10 to 15 minute window I would crash.  (the meds would last anywhere between 4 and 6 hours - and all of a suddent I would go from feeling amazing - to feeling horrid).  The crash was horrific.    Another tangent - I have a high metabolism (I weigh about 185 pounds - 14% body fat -but eat anywhere between 3,000 and 4,5000 calories a day).  I'm pretty sure my body was metabolizing the meds quickly and then crashing and burning. 

Anxiety medication isn't quite like eating food.  They have to build up in your system first (like between three to twelve weeks) and work at developing new neurons in your brain cells, which were killed off from anxiety, likewise they will have an effect on your gut, blood and nervous system.

If you were taking antianxiety medication, your symptoms were based more on withdrawl, meaning you probably were on a certain drug for a month or so, daily, and then changed meds.  Your body adjusted to the med, however, when taken away, it didn't know how to manage itself.   That would mean you were not quite prescribed correct dosages, and that has a big impact on effectivity.   Time period of whether you take it during the day or night, isn't really the issue with anxiety medication, it's more dosage and type.

But your symptoms don't sound like withdrawl, becausey you stated you still felt elevated highs.  So you may have not been on antianxiety medication, but possibly heart medication.

You really should call your old doctor and ask for transcripts of what he prescribed for you, and there should be no fee for this.   It would also help you in the future when you see another doctor and he asks what types of medications you've been in terms of your history.  Likewise this would help you to know if it was a medication, for mental health, causing this.  However, medications, of any type, have different effects on different people.  For example, when dealing with a medical issue like strep throat, a doctor may have to prescribe different medications to get the full healing effect on the body.  This is no different with medication used to manage anxiety.

Anxiety medication could be simliar to using a knife.  If used improperly, by not following the proper  supervison from someone who knows how to prescribe these medications, aka a psychiatrist, it can kill and bleed.  However if used under the right direction, it can carve beautiful objects from wood, or carve a beautiful life for you, without being bogged down by this serious health issue.  Generalized Anxiety Disorder is a deemed a legitamate disability in the United States.   You are actually covered by it, under law, from being fired for a job, since it is a disability.   


Quote
The major stress in my life was my job - I made a decision I could hold out until a specific date and then come hell or high water I was quiting.  I desperately tried to find a new job.  Nothing.  The date came.  I quit.  Pretty much flushed my career down the drain.  I filed bankruptcy not too long ago and now I am rebuilding.  It sucks.  But it happens. 

I come from a similiar background when managing my anxiety disorder.  I've left jobs, even housing conditions, in order to avoid stimulating, stressful  circumstances that activated my anxiety.   Yet after leaving the stressor, the anxiety still remained intact, and  I was under the false premise the anxiety would go away.  Now, I'm not saying you didn't have a stressful job, however your reaction to it may have been different compared to someone who doesn't suffer from an anxiety disorder.

Consequently, I know from experience, that anxiety disorders really rob you of intelligent thinking.  I've made a lot of stupid decisons, when under my anxiety disorder.  If I had it under control, many issues in my life would have never got out of hand.  Consequently, by now, you have probably have come to conclusion that anxiety disorders never fully go away. They are chronic conditions that come and go, but never fully leave you.  Even if you've been in remission for a couple of years, they can come back suddenly and really bite you in the axx.


Quote
I've been doing some research in what the military is doing for our soldiers coming back from the middle east.  Many of them are showing signs of PTSD.  And there have been record 0119 rates of returning military vets.  The government started researching methods of coping with PTSD.  They have been researching different medications, therapy, group therapy, acupuncture, herbal supplements, and so on.  I can't remember the book that I read that covered this research - I've been reading a lot about PTSD and anxiety.  Trying to figure out how I'm going to live with this.   Still don't have all the answers.  Probably never will.  Just trying to live my life.

Just to add a bit of optimism - we all know most people who enter the military are fairly compentent mentally.  In fact if you try to join the army, having prescribed mental health medication, you may be prevented from enlisting.  Regardless, a lot of the recruits that come back suffer PTSD and it has a negative impat on them for life.  So know, with an anxiety disorder, you are not alone in managing it, since other people with healthy mental backgrounds have developed it, in reaction to stressors in their life.   Anxiety disorders are not for the emotionally weak, instead they are for people with a medical disorder in reaction to stress.

Be free to email me if you ever need someone to discuss these issues about PTSD or GAD.
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Offline justliving

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Re: New Here
« Reply #6 on: August 29, 2013, 08:15:02 PM »
Hey Abraham - I think the next step is to get the transcript from my doctor to see what I was taking. 

As for the meds - I would take them and within 10 to 15 minutes feel immediately better.  That goes for the very first time I took them.  So, it doesn't sound like the type of med you have to build up over time.  Again - probably best to see the transcripts to see what I was taking. 

As for my diagnosis - I told her about my childhood.  Physically abusive alcoholic father.  Emotionally abusive neurotic mother.  Severe neglect from both.  I went into more detail, but that is the short of it. 

As for how anxiety affects your decision making.  Well, you are right.  If I was in a better place I wouldn't have made a decision to flush my career down the drain.  My whole department - 15 people or so were all very stressed out - plenty of people left for other jobs, most were in the process of finding something new, but I was the only one who left with no other job options.  So, my anxiety affected my decision - without a doubt.  And if I didn't have that anxiety I would not have left until I found something.  But like I said - I felt I didn't have sufficient time to give my doc the opportunity to dial in my meds.  The yo-yo affect was too much - and I just decided, I can't live like this.  Something has to give.  So I gave up my job.  I don't regret my decision - I just wish I had other options. 
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Offline Abraham2007

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Re: New Here
« Reply #7 on: August 30, 2013, 12:37:37 AM »
Quote
Hey Abraham - I think the next step is to get the transcript from my doctor to see what I was taking. 

As for the meds - I would take them and within 10 to 15 minutes feel immediately better.  That goes for the very first time I took them.  So, it doesn't sound like the type of med you have to build up over time.  Again - probably best to see the transcripts to see what I was taking.

I really suggest you do, and if I can be a nag, try to make it a priority.
 
Quote
As for my diagnosis - I told her about my childhood.  Physically abusive alcoholic father.  Emotionally abusive neurotic mother.  Severe neglect from both.  I went into more detail, but that is the short of it. 

You stated your doctor was a general practitioner (GP), but normally these details about your past aren't mentioned in a GP appointment.  My primary doctor asks more about physical symptoms and takes tests, like blood pressure, to see how my over-all body is working.  Of course, she does ask about stress and psychological symptoms, but only to an extent.

I'm surprised your doctor didn't direct you to a psychiatrist to further help you, if she knew this was more of a mental health issue for medical intervention, which may have not been her specialty.  My primary doctor isn't very familiar with anxiety disorders.  She has a good heart, and a good education, however she's made suggestions on medications which I look back and balk at, for my anxiety disorder; however she did direct me to a psychiatrist, being aware of her shortcomings in this health area.

Aside from that, one thing that caught me about your previous post was how you work to not play victim; just forget the past and let it go.  That has been my philosophy for many years since graduating high school, however, despite what I want to think, my biology can get in the way in maintaining those thoughts.  Fortunately, I've found that anxiety medication can control the physical reactions of negative thinking from interfering with how my thought processes and my nervous system work together.

Quote
As for how anxiety affects your decision making.  Well, you are right.  If I was in a better place I wouldn't have made a decision to flush my career down the drain.  My whole department - 15 people or so were all very stressed out - plenty of people left for other jobs, most were in the process of finding something new, but I was the only one who left with no other job options.  So, my anxiety affected my decision - without a doubt.  And if I didn't have that anxiety I would not have left until I found something.  But like I said - I felt I didn't have sufficient time to give my doc the opportunity to dial in my meds.  The yo-yo affect was too much - and I just decided, I can't live like this.  Something has to give.  So I gave up my job.  I don't regret my decision - I just wish I had other options.

That really is a shame that you had to be temporarily out of a job, before you left your last one.  I try to view jobs as part of a career progression, where the next job is a stepping stone to a better one, which includes better pay and better ways to utilize your skills.  However, my anxiety disorder has impacted my performance at my job, but somehow (by the grace of God) I've been able to slack by at my current position, when my anxiety got to an all time high. 

When it was really high, I could have been fired for poor performance, however I managed to stay at my job until I found an appropriate medication to deal with my anxiety symptoms.  Currently I am on Zoloft and am still experiencing it's positive effects in handling my anxiety, and I have no future plans to get off it.  Likewise it's bringing me to speed to my normal self again, so I can be an effective employee with my Systems team.
 
Just know life does get better, despite the temporary set backs of an anxiety disorder.  Life can be good again.
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Offline mountainman1

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Re: New Here
« Reply #8 on: August 30, 2013, 07:15:14 AM »
 I have been on a cocktail of medications from the VA for GAD , depression and PTSD over many years as a out patient. Stay away from benzo's they are poison horrible withdraws . I get my best medicine by exercising mainly hiking and walking everyday. It really works . Also cognitive therapy also . I think over all the years I have been on so many psy medications I have a certain amount of CNS damage . Best bet stay natural
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Offline Abraham2007

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Re: New Here
« Reply #9 on: August 30, 2013, 01:18:26 PM »
Hi MountainMan1,

I have been on a cocktail of medications from the VA for GAD , depression and PTSD over many years as a out patient. Stay away from benzo's they are poison horrible withdraws .

You're negative experience with benzophanines, particularly Ativan, isn't unique.  Some doctors are now refusing to prescribe ativan, or a similiar benzophanine, due to lawsuits of the withdrawl effects on Ativan.  In UK, most people can't even find a doctor that will prescribe ativan, while in the US it is much easier to get a prescription.

So, I know where you are coming from.   However, benzophanines are not normally prescribed as a long term effectant for an anxiety disorder, versus a standard FDA antidepressant.   If you've taken a benzophanine daily for a few months, there are often issues about withdrawl, so that is why following the advice of a doctor *familiar with the side effects* is mandatory to get off this medication.   Sometimes the withdrawl effect can be up to a year, and it's important to not self medicate, by withdrawing off this medication by yourself.

Do know, benzophanines, are being used for epilipsey with good results, not just mental disorders.  The normal prescribed benzophanine is klonopin, at 20mg, versus 1mg for a mental disorder, however most of the lawsuits are coming from users for mental health, and not epilepsy.  Part of that reason maybe that users of mental health may not be getting the proper direction on how to use a benzophanine for an anxiety disorder, versus someone on epilepsy, who maybe taking their health disorder more seriously, about usage, since mental health medication often has stigmas for usage, so a percentage of mental health users may not take their medication as regulated by their doctors, particularly if it isn't a psychiatrist who is trained on how to properly use these medications.

Aside from that, I do hope you're getting the proper treatment at the hospital for withdrawing from ativan, for your body to synthesize it.  I'm sorry you've had negative results, where it has made you bitter about medications.  There are people, however, that have found medications to be life saving, and even beneficial at improving their standard of life, prior to using it.  Some have returned to college and finished degrees, others have often praised saved marriages, due to the use of antianxiety medications, so there are a large mean of people who have gotten excellent results.

But again, I hope you're doing better.


Quote
I get my best medicine by exercising mainly hiking and walking everyday. It really works . Also cognitive therapy also . I think over all the years I have been on so many psy medications I have a certain amount of CNS damage . Best bet stay natural

Yes, exercise is a common, recommended use for boosting serotonin levels for someone with a mental health issue, like an anxiety disorder.  I also recommend fish oils too.

Medication can be a trial and error usage, although, I do know there are cases where some people don't find a medication to alleviate they're symptoms.  However there have been many cases of people who tried various medications from SSRIs, SNRIs, to finally trycyclics, and found success.  It's unfortunate that we have to work at finding an appropriate medication for our anxiety disorders, versus just taking any pill and getting guaranteed results.  But this is where we are scientifically with medications, until we can find another invention that can pinpoint the right medication, so we can avoid the trial and error process.

At this point, the best results for anxiety disorders are either CBT (Cognitive Behavior Therapy), which I know you've gotten good results from MountainMan, or medication, however the use of these practices should be done by someone trained in how to treat anxiety disorders.  For that reason, people, like myself, get educated as much as possible about their health disorder, and find the right therapy or medication, to deal with their symptoms.   

There is always light at the end of the tunnel, whether through the use of medications, or another route, to deal with an anxiety disorder.


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Offline justliving

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Re: New Here
« Reply #10 on: September 03, 2013, 12:18:13 AM »
I have been on a cocktail of medications from the VA for GAD , depression and PTSD over many years as a out patient. Stay away from benzo's they are poison horrible withdraws . I get my best medicine by exercising mainly hiking and walking everyday. It really works . Also cognitive therapy also . I think over all the years I have been on so many psy medications I have a certain amount of CNS damage . Best bet stay natural

I know that certain things work for some people and won't work at all for others.  I came on to this forum for several reasons - but I did want to hear what worked for other people. I know exercise works for a lot of people.  Spending time with nature.  Yoga, meditation, counseling, group therapy, etc.  I also know meds work for people.  I had a horrible trip on meds - yo yo effect.  So I started trying alternative remedies. Exercise is important to me.  Getting proper rest.  Meditation.  I want to get more into yoga. I have heard other people have found that as effective. 
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