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Nausea

Nausea is the sensation of unease and discomfort in the stomach with an urge to vomit.

Nausea is a symptom of many conditions, including motion sickness, morning sickness during pregnancy, viral infections, and other diseases. It is also a side effect of many drugs.

In medicine, nausea is a particular problem during some chemotherapy regimens and following general anaesthesia. Nausea is also a common symptom of pregnancy.

Whilst short-term nausea and vomiting are generally harmless, they may sometimes indicate a more serious disease. When associated with prolonged vomiting, it may cause dangerous levels of dehydration.

Symptomatic treatment for nausea and vomiting may include short-term avoidance of solid food. This is usually easy as nausea is nearly always associated with loss of appetite (anorexia). Dehydration may require rehydration with oral or intravenous electrolyte solutions. Oral rehydration is safer and simpler in most cases.

There are many antiemetic drugs to treat nausea, although the researchers continue to look for more effective treatments.


The information above is not intended for and should not be used as a substitute for the diagnosis and/or treatment by a licensed, qualified, health-care professional. This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It incorporates material originating from the Wikipedia article "Nausea".

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