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Author Topic: The body can be so confusing.  (Read 461 times)

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Offline Kmj023

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The body can be so confusing.
« on: June 24, 2014, 07:06:55 AM »
Lately I have been thinking about something. Everyone has symptoms here on this thread and everyone has health anxiety. Most people experience nuerological symptoms the most it seems. Mine has been a brain cancer fear off and on for almost 5 months as some of you may know, mine started off with a sinus infection that had me feeling off balance and I ran to google and then I thought I had brain tumor.  I think it was the balance symptom that had my mind drawn to the brain cancer fear the most. There's all kinds of ways to feel off balance. There's pure o spinning and falling down, there's just plain spinning, and there's no spinning, in which my case it was just me feeling as if the floor was moving under my feet which is more of a vertigo type feeling. Cause on the inside I was walking straight as I could be, but on the inside I felt really off balance.

So I simply got confused at exactly what the off balance was meaning under the brain cancer symptom. Either way I did have a ct scan without contrast which wasn't enough for me. Contrast would have been nice. But then MRI sounded nicer since they will show lots more.

What gets us confused is, how do we know what is anxiety and what isn't anxiety. How do we know that the anxiety is really lying to us? How do we know if what we are feeling should really be ignored? Now I'm not speaking for those who have had every test in the book. I'm talking about those of us who have not had a ct scan with contrast or MRI to rule out a brain tumor 100%. Or another neurological disease. 

I went to read brain cancer stories just to see exactly what patients experience with brain Tumors. Now I do not want people to flip out here especially if you already had a MRI. If you had had a MRI then you are good.

From what I read is that half of these brain tumor survivors were misdiagnosed at first only because their doctors did not do further image testing. Some of them went months with a brain tumor cause their doctors would simply not listen up them. Their symptoms were pretty much red flags. But some were not too severe enough where doctors were too concerned. The balance thing was actual people bumping into walls, the headaches were passed off as sinus headaches, this makes me mad. Some were people having severe memory problems. Cause of these symptoms being related to other common things, doctors did not think of it being a brain tumor. And they knocked it off as stress related and handed the patients nerve pills. And these people were not hypochondriacs like us. Maybe sometimes it is safe for us to ask for a ct scan or MRI since people can be misdiagnosed and have crappy doctors. There is nothing wrong with us wanting to be 100 percent sure.  Even if the dr seems sure we are ok. These people that I read about suffered cause they were believed to trust their doctor and did not ask for further testing.


My point here is not to scare anyone at all. What I'm basically saying is, if you have new symptoms that occur, such as a headache, severe dizziness, weakness in one side of the body, ect, you can come here and ask for advice or a second opinion, if you have had a ct scan or MRI and still worry then yes that for sure health anxiety.
If you come here and have not ever had either one, then you should ask for further imaging testing to be on safe side. That does not mean that it will end up giving you horrible news. In order for things to be entirely ruled out, that's how it will be diagnosed as anxiety. And if you still feel like crap even after all the testing then it's for sure anxiety, tests don't lie.

That's why it's important to have a doctor that will listen to you. If you have weird symptoms and think further testing would be more reassuring to you, like if the symptoms are totally new to you, doctors should just do what the patient wants cause things can be misdiagnosed. It's not often but it can happen. The gold standard for anything cancerous to be ruled out is ct scans and MRI's. And other testing if needed. People want to make sure they are healthy and then if all checks out ok, rest assured, it's anxiety. 

The body is confusing and there's so many things out there that have related symptoms. And it is sad that doctors refuse to listen to their patients. Even if it's just a bad headache and the dr passing it off as a migraine and sends them home without even ordering a ct scan or MRI. In my opinion, doctors need to cover the bases cause many have been sued due to not listening to their patients.

You have those without hypochondria who go to a doctor and have a new symptom who listen to the doctor and feel no change. And don't freak out but end up behind misdiagnosed cause they didn't want to cover all the bases. And that does not mean they end up with a bad diseAse.

Then you have us hypochondriacs who want testing done right away to make sure the bad stuff is ruled out. And doctors should be ok with that and once we get that testing done, that's when we should relax and blame it all on anxiety if that's the cause. Or if it turns out to be something simple such as migraines. 

That's all there is to it. But reading those with brain cancer I see that their symptoms were pretty severe and some weren't and doctors should not have ignored it.

So all I'm saying is, if new symptoms pop up out of this blue and you have not been seen by a doctor, go to one. And ask for testing to be on safe side. Even if your doctor doesn't think it's necessary. It does not hurt! And it's not silly.

What's silly is when we get the testing and yet still think that we have a disease and feel new symptons and then think we have a new disease or again have been misdiagnosed. That's for sure anxiety playing tricks.

The good thing about hypochondria is that we want to make sure things are ruled out.
The bad thing about hypochondria is that even when things are ruled out, we may feel the affects of anxiety itself cause of how stressed our body maybe and then we still believe there's something wrong.

This is just my two cents.







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"The only illness that we can't accept is hypochondria."

"Never Google, everyone will catch an invisible tumor!"

"Anxiety is not a doctor. Neither is the internet."

Actual diagnosis : chronic sinusitis.
Google diagnosis : brain cancer.

Symptoms : dizzy head feeling.

Offline TyeDyedButterfly

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Re: The body can be so confusing.
« Reply #1 on: June 24, 2014, 08:02:00 AM »
Good Post and a lot of good points!!

Everyone needs to see a doctor regardless and if they haven't had testing done then keep pushing to have it done to be on the safe side on any body part not just the brain.

I also believe if you feel your doctor isn't taking you seriously then find a new doctor and if the test are clear awesome no harm done !

Thanks for the post !
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Offline Kmj023

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Re: The body can be so confusing.
« Reply #2 on: June 24, 2014, 08:40:29 AM »
Thanks. I was hoping I wasn't saying touch or scaring people. :)
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"The only illness that we can't accept is hypochondria."

"Never Google, everyone will catch an invisible tumor!"

"Anxiety is not a doctor. Neither is the internet."

Actual diagnosis : chronic sinusitis.
Google diagnosis : brain cancer.

Symptoms : dizzy head feeling.

Offline sixpack

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Re: The body can be so confusing.
« Reply #3 on: June 24, 2014, 08:42:40 AM »
as I say, I don't tell people not to go to doctors.  People can go to their hearts' content.  But they shouldn't expect it will solve their anxiety disorder.  this site is FULL of posts about how they don't believe the test (often because it wasn't the right test, or doc read it wrong) or they move onto to the next disease not covered by the tests they went through. 

as far as a doctor "should provide the test..."  idea.  Two things:  1. doctor is supposed to 'do no harm'.  Unnecessary med testing goes against that.  2. If you are using your insurance for these expensive tests, then a doctor has to  have a legitimate reason to order it.  Insurance won't pay for "peace of mind" testing.  I would also hope a doctor wouldn't lie to give a test for such a reason either.  If said person is willing to pay for the test out of pocket, then so be it.  Either way, the person still will not find lasting solace.

KM-I get what you are saying.  You've googled so much on brain tumors and read a fe horror stories and it has heightened your anxiety.   I have known 7 people either firsthand or second hand with brain tumors.  None of those docs sloughed them off.  In fact their neuro exams were abnormal and warranted further testing.  Truth is with enough searching we can find any scary thing to support our fears.

devil's advocate here:   what happens if you go to your doctor and demand an MRI.  It comes back clear.  What happens when your next "out of the blue" symptom comes up----say diarrhea and then constipation then stomach pain.  Do you go to the doctor and demand a colonoscopy?  That comes up clear of cancer.  then you are fine for a bit.  all of a sudden you have gerd or reflux.  do you go and get an endoscopy?  Now here we are 1 yr from the brain mri.  you have dizziness again or what have you.  are you now questioning the MRI?   

Guess my question is:  when does the person come to the conclusion that all of this medical testing isn't helping?

Maybe some won't. Maybe the person will decide he/she has 'cured' the disorder by using continued medical testing as a coping mechanism.  There a few here who do that.  If that is your point of view, that is your prerogative.

I know you don't agree with me.  I know you think a non contrasted ctscan was worthless.  I know you think the MRI will be your proof positive that you don't have a brain tumor.  So feeling that way go and demand the MRI. while I don't agree with doing this:   If you feel the doctor won't give you an MRI with the symptoms you have,  exaggerate them so a doctor can make a "case" for an MRI.   Maybe you can prove me wrong and this WILL give you the peace you need. 

Good LUCK and be well


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MOST anxiety occurs on a subconscious level.  JUST because you don't feel consciously anxious or had a day or two of calm doesn't mean your mind & body are relaxed.  It can take months of reduced anxiety before a body goes back to a more non-reactive state

Offline Kmj023

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Re: The body can be so confusing.
« Reply #4 on: June 24, 2014, 09:17:27 AM »

Sixpack -
In not saying that everyone is being misdiagnosed of diseases of any kind. And you can pass an nuerological exam and have a brain tumor. It depends all on how big the tumor is and location. Reading those stories made me see that these people had severe symptoms mostly and the doctors did not even care. They were sued and no it doesn't always happen. That's why I was saying that it doesn't hurt to have testing done to be on safe side. I had a doctor tell me one time that things need to be ruled out to find the problem, especially when it comes to anxiety since it can mimic so many things. No it doesn't take away the anxiety disorder, but that's whatelse you can discuss with your doctor and get treatment.

As for me being a true hypochondriac like some of these people on here, I'm not. I'm not the type that goes running to the doctor for every ache and pain. Before this sinus infection I did not have health anxiety, I would have migraines, stomach pains, eye twitches, occasionally and never for one second thought oh no I have a disease. I had not seen a doctor since 2005 until this year and the only reason why my hypochondria kicked in was cause of me feeling off balance since that was first time it ever hapoened to me. Plus google, which I have learned my lesson about that now. It's the devil and will scare anybody.

If they go to the doctor and want to be 100 percent sure that's fine. The medical testing don't help if they still continue to have anxiety which was my point. I wasn't talking about them who keep on going and going. 

If I was gonna get an MRI I would have already. I haven't cause deep down I know that it's pointless. I know my symptoms started with allergies and anxiety. I know my anxiety is just pulling that same trick on me and I'm trying to ignore the what ifs. It's been 5 months and if I had a tumor I know by now it would been size of a golf all and something would have shown on the scan. I only looked up stories to see how severe the symptoms could be and mine are not even close.
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"The only illness that we can't accept is hypochondria."

"Never Google, everyone will catch an invisible tumor!"

"Anxiety is not a doctor. Neither is the internet."

Actual diagnosis : chronic sinusitis.
Google diagnosis : brain cancer.

Symptoms : dizzy head feeling.

Offline sixpack

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Re: The body can be so confusing.
« Reply #5 on: June 24, 2014, 10:08:19 AM »
When my sister had her brain tumor this is what the neurosurgeon told us:

brains are very accommodating to tumors.  Brain function will continue normally until the tumor becomes big enough to impede brain function (and like you said based on location).  Once big enough, that is when people become symptomatic.  Once symptomatic, they can be seen via ct scans and mris.

anyway that is just a bit of information.

Having reread your comment I can see the point you were making.   :yes:  I first read it more like you get a symptom solve it by demanding tests. So I apologize for blathering on in my other post.  That is what I get for reading fast when getting kids ready for school.  :-*  (tomorrow is FINALLY the last day)
   
 
 I tend to agree that if you've NEVER found yourself with anxiety (any type because they all produce symptoms),  it is a REAL wake up call.  Newbies have a huge learning curve.  this usually means they do all of the googling, self checking, reassurance seeking etc.  They ramp themselves up into quite a hot mess.  So I agree that these peeps should do the doctor trip.  It is part of learning what anxiety can do.


finally an observation on the horror stories:  there will always be horror stories on the internet.  sometimes they can be more than any 'good' stories for sure.  However these are still the exception rather than the rule.  Usually only the people who have bad experiences  post on the internet.  those with "my doc caught the illness right away " aren't posting their stories on the internet. they are out living their lives.   As an example,  (maybe a weird one) I live in NY.  On my social media page I 'like' the governor's page, my senators pages....  you know the peeps who are representing me.  At any rate you can read comments on their pages and you'd think EVERYONE hates these people.  Why?  because mostly it is the angry ones posting.  those who are happy with the leaders of the state aren't posting away.  they are out and about.  What is hilarious, in a sad way,  those angry people (maybe 30 or 40)  only see other angry posts.  this makes them think their views are the views of everyone in the state.   When in actuality it doesn't prove that at all.  What it proves is there are a % of peoples hot spitting mad.  This kinda the same with the horror stories....  yep there are crappy doctors that miss things.   the internet has a lot of those stories but as a whole it is still an exception rather than the rule.


anyway sorry for misreading your original post
 



 
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MOST anxiety occurs on a subconscious level.  JUST because you don't feel consciously anxious or had a day or two of calm doesn't mean your mind & body are relaxed.  It can take months of reduced anxiety before a body goes back to a more non-reactive state

Offline Kmj023

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Re: The body can be so confusing.
« Reply #6 on: June 24, 2014, 11:06:03 AM »
Yes. I believe that's true. If there's anything on the brain that is causing symptoms
Something should very well come up.  Apprently if it's big enogh to create symptoms then it will stick it's nasty head out in a scan.  I know nothing about how brain Tumors or how they work.  I've heard so many things.

No I don't think everyone should get thousands of test done for one symptom. Like if someone has a bad leg ache that doesn't mean blood clot but some people go tgat extent and think that's what it is.  I'm happy I don't have hypochondria as bad as some people.


But you are right about the internet. That's why it's not good to go searching. It always and always will just spit out the bad diseases and the bad stories. It's like it is doing it on purpose to scare everyone. That's why I never watched the news cause it's all depressing stuff.
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"The only illness that we can't accept is hypochondria."

"Never Google, everyone will catch an invisible tumor!"

"Anxiety is not a doctor. Neither is the internet."

Actual diagnosis : chronic sinusitis.
Google diagnosis : brain cancer.

Symptoms : dizzy head feeling.

Offline chunkymonkey

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Re: The body can be so confusing.
« Reply #7 on: June 25, 2014, 11:33:31 PM »
Omg its like you read my mind. Ive been thinking about the same thing for the past few months. Ive been having so many symptoms related to my brain and the drs all say its migraine, sinus related or headache and would not give me referral to ct or mri. I also read BT stories and i felt so much anger towards the drs that misdiagnosed them. Like i feel some drs dont know what theyre doing and they need to go back to school and relearn their stuff. I feel like getting an mri is the only way to help ease my anxiety. Just by listening to drs say its not a brain problem is not very conceiving since so many ppl are misdiagnosed.
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Offline Kmj023

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Re: The body can be so confusing.
« Reply #8 on: June 25, 2014, 11:43:43 PM »
Yeah I know. There are some bad doctors and there are some really good doctors. My doctor doesn't seem to be a very good listener. I would be telling her my concerns and she would just cut me off and not listen and walk out the room. My ent is a good doctor. I told her my concern of a brain tumor and she showed me my ct scan but it was without contrast and then I heard doctors say that they can be missed.

I want MRI too. I think it would give me piece of mind and help me get on my way to recovery. It may not take my anxiety all alway but I have a self help book I'm gonna order to help me.

The stories  I have read made me see how some doctors can't be that trusted. A woman was having bad headaches and the kept telling her it was stress, and for her to deal with it.  She ended up with brain tumor. Not saying that's us, but saying doctors should really listen more.
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"The only illness that we can't accept is hypochondria."

"Never Google, everyone will catch an invisible tumor!"

"Anxiety is not a doctor. Neither is the internet."

Actual diagnosis : chronic sinusitis.
Google diagnosis : brain cancer.

Symptoms : dizzy head feeling.

Offline Toasted Butter

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Re: The body can be so confusing.
« Reply #9 on: June 26, 2014, 12:10:00 AM »
This is how I look at it: if you have a cluster of symptoms, some of which might indicate a tumor but all of which could indicate anxiety, then anxiety is simply the more logical diagnosis. It's not that a tumor is impossible; it's just that there is no reason to assume that it is likely either, given that the other symptoms already point to anxiety. Certainly it's possible for a person to have both, just like it's possible for a basement to flood due to ground water AND a backed-up toilet, but usually if your basement is flooding and the rain has been pouring steadily for a week and the ground around your house has gotten soft and spongy, then you probably have ground water coming up through your basement and there's no reason to suspect the toilet is backing up as well unless there is also sewage present or water is visibly pouring out of the toilet or something.

My father had brain cancer and he was the last person to believe that there was anything wrong with him. When I tried to get him to see a doctor he insisted that nothing was wrong. He was just tired, he said. That was all. He even got upset about me bugging him about it and even said some slightly hurtful things about me bothering him about it (which was totally out of character for him, only reenforcing my concerns). But all of this seemed totally normal to him in his condition.
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Offline Kmj023

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Re: The body can be so confusing.
« Reply #10 on: June 26, 2014, 12:22:57 AM »
You make a good point. I think what my big problem is, is that I don't know much about how brain Tumors work. I've heard different stories. Like I hear how it affects the persons balance. But not sure just what kind that is. Or when it says it affects the eyes. If I had someone to actually sit down with me and explain it to me maybe that would make me realize that I am really ok. That's why I went looking online to read people's stories and what the actual symptoms were. But it just brought up bad stories of people being misdiagnosed for it being stress related, sinus infections, and migraines. Not what I needed to hear. Then I hear that people can go a long time with just one symptom when I thought cancer could not wait that long. It just gets me confused cause the brain is responsible for so many things. I think that's why I have a hard time with the fear. If that makes sense.
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"The only illness that we can't accept is hypochondria."

"Never Google, everyone will catch an invisible tumor!"

"Anxiety is not a doctor. Neither is the internet."

Actual diagnosis : chronic sinusitis.
Google diagnosis : brain cancer.

Symptoms : dizzy head feeling.

Offline chunkymonkey

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Re: The body can be so confusing.
« Reply #11 on: June 26, 2014, 12:55:11 AM »
I wish our body had more obvious symptoms like heart disease would cause your nails to turn yellow or BT would cause your hair to turn green or one single blood test would show all cancers and disease you may have. It sucks that some drs wont even consider writing a referral for ct or mri because they think its not necessary. My dr knows im a hypochondriac but he keeps saying i dont need an mri because he thinks its more sinus or migraine related. Its stupid since i pay copay for each dr visit and all he does it prescribe me meds that dont even work
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Offline Kmj023

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Re: The body can be so confusing.
« Reply #12 on: June 26, 2014, 01:00:58 AM »
I so agree with you there. Green hair for bt yes or if it's something else like ms hair turns purple or skin turns pink lol. A color for each symptom would be easier. Lol.

Is headaches the reason you think you have a brain tumor.

I agree your doctor should want to help you ease your mind at least. And I've spent tons of money on meds and have not felt much relief.
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"The only illness that we can't accept is hypochondria."

"Never Google, everyone will catch an invisible tumor!"

"Anxiety is not a doctor. Neither is the internet."

Actual diagnosis : chronic sinusitis.
Google diagnosis : brain cancer.

Symptoms : dizzy head feeling.

Offline sixpack

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Re: The body can be so confusing.
« Reply #13 on: June 26, 2014, 07:55:39 AM »
the first thing a doc is tasked to do is to ''do no harm".  Ordering additional testing without cause  goes against that.  I know a lot of people (HA peeps) don't see the harm of ordering tests but the harm can be two-fold 1, medical testing, often, has its own complications and risks)  2.  ordering peace of mind tests. which some docs DO do under the assumption that people will accept the results and move on---which most do provided you are not suffering from anxiety---However such tests ONLY keeps a person mired in anxiety.  Here is a neurologist from my area speaking about a group of teens who developed conversion disorder that made the news about 2 yrs ago speaking on that subject.   Actually this neuro is from the same practice that my daughter goes to.



By Sandra Tan

NEWS STAFF REPORTER

Published:February 8, 2012, 11:41 PM

Updated: February 10, 2012, 5:37 PM


The national media spotlight has been shining on rural Le Roy for weeks, lending heat to the questions surrounding the strange illness that has led to 18 students exhibiting uncontrollable gestures, sounds and seizures.
 
The teenage Le Roy girls have made for riveting TV in recent weeks, with close-ups of one-time cheerleaders and student-athletes now twitching and pleading for answers.
 
The scrutiny has led to debates about whether the media are helping parents find answers to a "mystery illness" or exploiting vulnerable families and worsening the plight of sick children.
 
This week, WGRZ-TV announced it will stop repeatedly showing footage of twitching girls they've interviewed.
 
The initial diagnosis of the majority of the afflicted students was that individually, they suffered from conversion disorder, and collectively, they suffered from mass psychogenic illness. A few others had pre-existing conditions, including one with Tourette's syndrome.
 
Speculation persists about whether other triggers could have led to this cluster of illnesses.
 
The Buffalo News has attempted to summarize much of what's happening in Le Roy, based on data from the Department of Health, the Environmental Protection Agency, the school district and interviews with nearly a dozen neurologists, researchers, psychiatrists and other physician specialists.
 
Q: What's the difference between conversion disorder, mass hysteria and mass psychogenic illness?
 
A: Conversion disorder occurs when someone develops neurologic symptoms, such as involuntary movements and sounds -- "tics" -- that have no known physical cause. Conversion disorder is believed to be the physical manifestation of psychological stress.
 
 "These types of symptoms are a very important part of our humanity," said Dr. John T. Walkup, a child and adolescent psychiatrist and chairman of the Medical Advisory Board of the Tourette Syndrome Association. "People who are vulnerable to this are usually highly smart, vulnerable to suggestion and very sensitive."
 
Symptoms in these cases are not fake but are believed to be produced by the brain's subconscious.
 
When conversion disorder occurs in a group of people, typically from a close-knit community, the diagnosis for the group is mass hysteria or mass psychogenic illness. Mass psychogenic illness is the preferred medical term because of the negative connotations associated with mass hysteria.
 
Mass psychogenic illness is far more common in females than males.
 
Q: How common are these conditions?
 
A: Conversion disorder is common. Neurologists see such cases on a regular basis. Some, however, are careful when they explain the diagnosis to a patient because they don't want patients reacting negatively.
 

"I like to describe it as a subconscious movement disorder," said Dr. Thomas Guttuso Jr., a neurologist and movement disorder specialist with the Jacobs Neurological Institute. "I, generally, very much try to avoid terms like 'psychogenic,' certainly 'hysterical.' They tend to imply some kind of character weakness in the patient."
 
Most people experience conversion disorder on a much lower level. If asked to give a speech, for instance, some develop temporary hand tremors, rapid heart rates and shortness of breath.

Mass psychogenic illness is far more rare, but it's probably more common than people think. The condition has been documented for hundreds of years all around the globe and attributed to everything from unknown chemical warfare agents to demonic possession.
 
In recent decades, most cases of mass psychogenic illness have been found to affect female students in rural schools.
 
Q: How is conversion disorder diagnosed?
 
A: Neurologists are trained to recognize the difference between involuntary gestures or tics stemming from physical brain malfunctions and the abnormal movements generated from psychological triggers.
 
True tic disorders, such as Tourette's syndrome, look different than what these students exhibit.

"In neurology, this is what we do, this is what we've been trained to know," said Dr. Lazlo Mechtler, vice president of Dent Neurologic Institute, which has evaluated and treated many of the Le Roy girls. "It's a science that's been passed down for 300 years. To us, it's our bread and butter."
 

Neurologists recalled watching a news segment of one of the affected Le Roy girls with a flailing right arm. The video subsequently showed the same girl carefully applying eye liner with the same arm. They said that diversity of movement cannot be explained by any other neurological condition.
 
 Neurologists usually order blood work and imaging tests to double-check their initial findings and rule out other causes as a precaution, but the tests rarely contradict the initial diagnosis.
 
In the Le Roy outbreak, far more tests than usual were done on these girls because so many got sick. More environmental factors needed to be ruled out. Most of the afflicted students were seen and tested by multiple physicians.
 
Three of the original 12 were found to have pre-existing tic-related disorders, including one with Tourette's syndrome. The rest were repeatedly diagnosed as having conversion disorder by more than one physician.
 
Most of the patients seen at Dent were tested for thyroid disorders, lupus, Lyme disease, liver abnormalities, heavy metals such as lead and mercury, autoimmune disorders and strep, Mechtler said. They also had MRI brain imaging and EEG brainwave monitoring.
 
Q: Given family and community concerns in Le Roy, why not do more tests, just to make sure?
 
A: Neurologists worry that conducting too many medical tests can reinforce a patient's false belief that something undiscovered is at the heart of the condition and worsen symptoms.
  Patients who demand more tests over the recommendation of their physicians will sometimes also refuse treatment until the "real cause" is found.
 
"As the hunt goes on to find cause, often the people with conversion are waiting and not engaging in any treatment to get better," said Walkup, who is also director of the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at Weill Cornell Medical College and New York-Presbyterian Hospital.
 

Of all the afflicted Le Roy students, the ones who have accepted their diagnoses and continued to receive treatment are the ones who have improved or been cured, said Mechtler and his colleague, Dr. Jennifer McVige.
 
   If enough tests are conducted on an individual, eventually, a test will turn up something abnormal. Doing all the testing required to check and see if every other patient has the same abnormality and determine a plausible link among them all is both time consuming and unnecessary, physicians say.
 
Q: Some of these girls say they don't believe they've led stressful lives. How could this be the cause?
 
A: Physicians say it is not unusual for a patient to initially inform them that they don't know of any trauma or stress that could be the underlying cause for their condition. Sometimes, a major life stress is subconscious -- it exists beyond a patient's awareness -- and does not come to light without more probing discussion or conversation with a physician or mental health professional.
 

The Health Department report released late last week noted that most of the students diagnosed with conversion disorder "all had significant life stressors, a common factor with conversion disorder."
 
Q: How can something completely mental lead to such physical symptoms?
 
A. The brain is extremely powerful. There have been countless documented medical cases of physically healthy patients suffering from numbness, paralysis and even blindness that can be attributed solely to a psychological cause
   


so while I know we anxious want more tests, more often than not, it only hinders getting the help we need to get better.

btw the girls involved (as of the last update)  are recovering/recovered.  they recovered through anxiety meds and therapy. 



KM---  I do know some about brain tumors.  what actually needs to be said to you to help you move on?  I mean one of the biggest issues with people on az is that they look up stuff online and in their state of mind everything seems to point to their fear.  It makes them think doctors aren't listening.  Barring an actual incompetent doctor....it isn't that they are not listening.  it is only the've seen X disease so many times that they just KNOW that isn't what is going on.  In your case, you had a ctscan.  Likely because the doc wanted to help ease your mind.  Which, it plainly did not.

As far as which eye symptoms:  brain tumors will cause blind spots.  Once it happens, it is 24/7.  For my dad he lost all peripheral vision in his right eye.  I don't mean blurry or weird or fuzzy, but gone.   He had simple partial seizures.  His first symptom (in retrospect) was about a year before diagnosis --impotence.  About 3-4 months before diagnosis he lost the peripheral vision, he lost function of his left arm and left leg, he was slurring speech, and, of course, the seizures.    He went to the eye doc.  eye doc could see a shadow in/on his eye.  eye doc said, "you need to see a neurologist, I think you have a brain tumor."   He had a malignant tumor about the size of a quarter located in his temporal lobe.  The temporal lobe explains his simple partial seizures perfectly.

My sister had a  benign menigioma located on her right frontal lobe at midline (basically on top of hers just back from her forehead).  It was the size of a baseball at diagnosis.  It was there for about 3-4 yrs by time diagnosis.  My sister's first symptom, due to location, was personality changes  (and possibly thyroid issues).  About a year before dx, she was steadily having worsening motor problems.  she had balance issues.  I mean to the point that she needed help walking downstairs.  she couldn't get off of the lawn mower.  she couldn't support herself on her left leg.  Her left arm was used as just a "helper".  by that I mean it was only good to hold something in its place.... she said she just laid her hand the car steering wheel, for instance.  She had MOTOR focal SEIZURES.  this means, at times, her left hand would just curl up.  she would be going about her business then she would notice her hand was fisted.  it didn't hurt.  it was just closed up.  the seizures also would cause her left arm or leg to just shake.  I don't mean vibrate but shake.  she described one time, while at the beach, her leg just started to severely shake about.  again not vibrating or twitching or buzzing BUT bouncing.  Others noticed as well.  what got her to the hospital was a tonic/clonic seizure (aka gran mal).   My sister AND her husband KNEW for a long time something  was wrong, but she doesn't have insurance... so she carried a bugger of a tumor for years.   That was in 2008.  she is fine.

a classmate has a glioblastoma--- he was having seizures like my sister-motor focal.  his arm would just draw up to his side.  He was also having  TREMENDOUS headaches.

a neighbors grandson's tumor caused seizures.

a friend's brother's presented with a tonic/clonic seizure.

as a kid, I knew a little 3yr old who had a brain stem tumor.

my children's preschool teacher's 14 yr old daughter had a brain stem tumor--- her daughter began tripping and falling down all of the time.



the most COMMON feature that you will note is seizure.  that is because brain tumor stress a brain and when a brain gets stressed, it sends out messed up electrical charges.  VERY often the pressure of a tumor will cause pressure changes in the eye.  Meaning the glaucoma test, tests more than glaucoma.  If pressure is elevated in the eye (normal pressure is anywhere in the teens) it can point to issues within the brain.


Finally, AS I also mentioned in an earlier post, the problem with looking things up online is that one almost always only finds OR only keys in on is the HORROR stories:  the stories of incompetent doctors.  However that is not showing the true picture.  AS it is almost always only horror stories that get told.  the VAST, VAST majority of people with X disease are diagnosed early on.   AND those who are anxious or those who have decided that they must have X illness prior to looking things up are the people who are most harmed by these stories.






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MOST anxiety occurs on a subconscious level.  JUST because you don't feel consciously anxious or had a day or two of calm doesn't mean your mind & body are relaxed.  It can take months of reduced anxiety before a body goes back to a more non-reactive state

Offline Kmj023

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Re: The body can be so confusing.
« Reply #14 on: June 26, 2014, 11:54:57 AM »
Thank you six pack for explaining to me what real symptoms are and can be of a brain tumor. And the ct scan I had was for my sinuses and I asked for contrast but they did not request that. After that day talking with the ent and seeing my ct scan results I felt relief I came home feeling great. And then I had someone to tell me on a forum that she and I had the same symptoms and same tumor and told me to get MRI cause hers was missed. I did not read that intentional by all means. What I was doing was cleaning out my phone to out away all the crap once and for all then as I was deleting the stuff I saw her comment and was like ugh and told myself no, you can't listen to her and sure enough my relief did not last very long. She knew I had health anxiety and she should not have said she and I had the same tumor I guess she wasn't thinking.

The brain just loves to stay focused on all the negative and I'm working hard every day to not entertain these negative thoughts. No matter how bad the symptoms are, no matter how off I feel, just trying to say there is nothing wrong with me despite of the what if voice. I try to keep my mind occupied. Hard to do when I feel so much pressure in my head and eyes but I try. My ent said I can go back for follow up and if my allergies are no better I will tell her. I hope that my new allergy pills work. My eyes feel so off right now and my head feels off. Allergies are no fun. I'm hoping to find relief.


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"The only illness that we can't accept is hypochondria."

"Never Google, everyone will catch an invisible tumor!"

"Anxiety is not a doctor. Neither is the internet."

Actual diagnosis : chronic sinusitis.
Google diagnosis : brain cancer.

Symptoms : dizzy head feeling.

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