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Author Topic: I wsa fine for a couple of weeks. Fear of my son being austic.  (Read 523 times)

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Offline Hypowoman90

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Re: I wsa fine for a couple of weeks. Fear of my son being austic.
« Reply #15 on: July 17, 2014, 08:55:36 PM »
Thanks. My son understand most directions but only recently started asking questions and that is only some of the time... He will be getting speech therapy when he starts school again in aug.

It's the constant babbling too, that has me worried.
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Offline Melbu

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Re: I wsa fine for a couple of weeks. Fear of my son being austic.
« Reply #16 on: July 18, 2014, 11:36:22 AM »
My son is 6 and has autism, he's extremely bright - outgoing - friendly - he likes giving hugs if he knows you and is a pattern thinker. Hence why music, numbers and even spelling are easy concepts to him. Also he looks you in the eye when you talk to him.

That all said, his problem was speech (which he is getting better and better all the time) he was of course speech delayed and now through school and speech therapy he has advanced a lot.

He also tends to repeat things like "Hey, look (insert person), that car is red.".. until I say "Yes, that car is red, you're right" or something to that effect, he'll repeat "Look that car is red".

Even being contrary can be a manifestation of autism. If I give him 2 options for something, he'll pick the 1st option, then after I agree to that, he then picks the second option. That happens a lot with tons of things but we're working on that.

He's a great kid, behaves EXTREMELY well in any public places - and is friendly to others.

Autism isn't a one size fits all thing, it's more like a person who thinks outside the box and has a particular set of skills better than your own. Some autistic people have a photographic memory (there was an autistic man that flew  around San Fransisco in a helicopter for one round, landed and drew the city to it's exact measure."  Some are great with numbers and become mathematicians ( My sons friend has aspergers "another form of autism" and he is doing geometry now and he's 7 years old." My son will probably surpass me in instruments, reading music and developing songs, doing better than I did and he's 6.

Though these things are fantastic and autistic people have great inventive minds, they're also lacking "usually" in the social department - luckily, my son doesn't have this issue, not all autistic people have social issues with others.  But his friend certainly has social issues, he's only 7 and was kicked out of 4 different schools because those schools didn't really know how to target his needs. Now he's in a great school that targets people with his exceptional gifts and his social issues.

My son on the other hand has never had those issues and all the kids love him.. they want to play with him all the time because he's just that friendly.

Keep this in mind, if you ever discover your child is autistic, don't fret - it's not a disease, some people are handicapped with it in severe cases, yes. But many people have milder forms of it that chemically changes things. They can see the world differently, yes - but in many cases those different perspectives is what enhanced our way of life. :)

In general, they live fantastic long lives and some want family's of their own and some just want to be single and work with the things they enjoy "kinda like Sherlock Holmes =P".   

Hope this helps, embrace the strengths your child has and work through any rough spots and they'll be fine.  :happy0151:
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Offline Hypowoman90

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Re: I wsa fine for a couple of weeks. Fear of my son being austic.
« Reply #17 on: July 21, 2014, 08:23:47 PM »
My son is 6 and has autism, he's extremely bright - outgoing - friendly - he likes giving hugs if he knows you and is a pattern thinker. Hence why music, numbers and even spelling are easy concepts to him. Also he looks you in the eye when you talk to him.

That all said, his problem was speech (which he is getting better and better all the time) he was of course speech delayed and now through school and speech therapy he has advanced a lot.

He also tends to repeat things like "Hey, look (insert person), that car is red.".. until I say "Yes, that car is red, you're right" or something to that effect, he'll repeat "Look that car is red".

Even being contrary can be a manifestation of autism. If I give him 2 options for something, he'll pick the 1st option, then after I agree to that, he then picks the second option. That happens a lot with tons of things but we're working on that.

He's a great kid, behaves EXTREMELY well in any public places - and is friendly to others.

Autism isn't a one size fits all thing, it's more like a person who thinks outside the box and has a particular set of skills better than your own. Some autistic people have a photographic memory (there was an autistic man that flew  around San Fransisco in a helicopter for one round, landed and drew the city to it's exact measure."  Some are great with numbers and become mathematicians ( My sons friend has aspergers "another form of autism" and he is doing geometry now and he's 7 years old." My son will probably surpass me in instruments, reading music and developing songs, doing better than I did and he's 6.

Though these things are fantastic and autistic people have great inventive minds, they're also lacking "usually" in the social department - luckily, my son doesn't have this issue, not all autistic people have social issues with others.  But his friend certainly has social issues, he's only 7 and was kicked out of 4 different schools because those schools didn't really know how to target his needs. Now he's in a great school that targets people with his exceptional gifts and his social issues.

My son on the other hand has never had those issues and all the kids love him.. they want to play with him all the time because he's just that friendly.

Keep this in mind, if you ever discover your child is autistic, don't fret - it's not a disease, some people are handicapped with it in severe cases, yes. But many people have milder forms of it that chemically changes things. They can see the world differently, yes - but in many cases those different perspectives is what enhanced our way of life. :)

In general, they live fantastic long lives and some want family's of their own and some just want to be single and work with the things they enjoy "kinda like Sherlock Holmes =P".   

Hope this helps, embrace the strengths your child has and work through any rough spots and they'll be fine.  :happy0151:
Thanks. I know that some autistic people can be brilliant.
But those people usually start showing signs of their intelligence at a very young age. The parents of these people usually say that they could tell even as an infant.

I just see all of these stories about parents who end up having to take care of them until they die... This quite frankly scares me. Very much.  Especially since my relationship with his father isn't stable. I don't want to have to do this all alone if this ends up being the case. Whenever I look at blogs, forums etc by single moms of disabled kids one of first things I notice is how sad and lonely they are.

Whenever I'm around kids that are my son's age, I can't help but feel a little sad and even a little jealous of their parents. How they are able to communicate with their kids. Share stories, talk about their day, etc.
Keep in mind that most kids his age are talking in complete sentences ( some more simpler than others ).
My son can't even put two words together...


None of this means I don't love my son. Please believe that.
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Offline sixpack

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Re: I wsa fine for a couple of weeks. Fear of my son being austic.
« Reply #18 on: July 21, 2014, 08:53:20 PM »
I am not saying your son is autistic or disabled or any such thing.

but..


what would you do IF tomorrow your child was dx'd with autism or some other developmental or congenital issue?

Yes you would be upset....  but as his MOTHER what would you do?

I will tell you, as a mother of 6 kids, what you would do.  I know because my oldest, 27, was born with a severe congenital brain malformation---dx'd at 4months old.  I was a single mom (adopted) at the time and my fourth dx'd with dyspraxia (she is doing well and 16).  You will grieve a bit, but mostly you will love your child and you will do the very best for your child.  You will advocate for your child.  You will be your child's champion.  Your child will love you and bring you joy.   

Hypo---all of this worrying you are doing isn't helpful or productive at all.  This worry doesn't prevent OR cause autism.  all this fretting accomplishes is to suck joy from your life and your child's.   

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MOST anxiety occurs on a subconscious level.  JUST because you don't feel consciously anxious or had a day or two of calm doesn't mean your mind & body are relaxed.  It can take months of reduced anxiety before a body goes back to a more non-reactive state

Offline Hypowoman90

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Re: I wsa fine for a couple of weeks. Fear of my son being austic.
« Reply #19 on: August 21, 2014, 02:55:31 AM »
Can I ask what types of symptoms your dyspraxic child had?
I think my son might have this. He has poor motor skills ( Fine. Things like taking off clothes, holding a pencil,etc ). He also had feeding issues when he was younger. Constantly stuffing his mouth and choking on food and drinks. His doctor wasn't concerned about this then. He still drools quite a bit and still occasionally chokes on foods.
He starts school again tomorrow. So we will see.

I've never ( to my knowledge ) been officially diagnosed with this, I struggled a lot with this as a child. I was officially diagnosed with ADD when I was his age and when  I was a tween I was diagnosed with dyscalculia. My ADD was pretty severe at the time. I was very old when I started being able to tie my shoes I couldn't draw inside the lines, cut neatly, write and draw, etc at an age where most other kids mastered these years earlier... the problem wasn't addressed until I was around 13 and switched to much better school district.  I started occupational therapy were  I had to practice writing, typing and did exercises like tying knots.

Most of my symptoms went away on their own but to this day i cant draw and still have sloppy handwriting. I also am clumsy. Dropping things, missing when I try to  kick a  ball that isn't even moving and a few other things... These things  are not bad enough to have an impact on my life. I always just thought my ADHD caused this and never thought much about it at all until my son started showing concerning signs.

All through elementary school  I struggled and learned everything at a very slow pace. My mom was very concerned. Sometimes She would just walk away from me and start to cry when she would try to help me learn things...
Aside from my dyscalculia everything else went away by the time  I went to high school without intervention. Besides math, things very easy to me. I was  often complimented on my intelligence  and scolded for not taking advantage of it. But by that time my earlier experiences had ruined my self esteem so much I did not care about anything. I felt and still do sometimes, stupid.  I got straight F's and took the easiest classes available even though I could have easily taken more advanced classes and got straight A's and B's. I ended up dropping out of school my senior year.

Sorry. This has turned in to me ranting about my own experiences...

When I think of all of the problems I had as a child, I sometimes feel hopeful for my son. I ended up growing out of most of my problems on my own. So perhaps my son can also grow out of them, and show how intelligent he is.  Then I have days where  I worry he will struggle forever. I don't want him to feel as bad about himself as I did when I was a child.

I don't know .

I apologize for any typos or grammatical errors. It's 2AM and my mind of going 100 miles per hour.
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Offline mollyfin

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Re: I wsa fine for a couple of weeks. Fear of my son being austic.
« Reply #20 on: August 21, 2014, 05:20:09 AM »
I was very old when I started being able to tie my shoes I couldn't draw inside the lines, cut neatly, write and draw, etc at an age where most other kids mastered these years earlier...

Most of my symptoms went away on their own but to this day i cant draw and still have sloppy handwriting. I also am clumsy. Dropping things, missing when I try to  kick a  ball that isn't even moving and a few other things...

You and me both, on all of these things.  I STILL can't do most of these things (except tie my shoes, thankfully, as they don't make Velcro sneakers in my size!)  and I was diagnosed with ADD or ADHD (forget which) as a teen (they suspect I had it all along but since I wasn't hyper as a kid no one noticed).  I wonder if there's a connection.
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Offline Hypowoman90

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Re: I wsa fine for a couple of weeks. Fear of my son being austic.
« Reply #21 on: August 21, 2014, 11:11:19 AM »
There is a connection  with both ADD and dyscalculia. Autism too which of course  take as a bad sign.
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Offline Hypowoman90

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Re: I wsa fine for a couple of weeks. Fear of my son being austic.
« Reply #22 on: August 21, 2014, 01:07:03 PM »
Welp. Just put my son on his school bus for the first time ever and now I am worried sick he will fall out of the window or something. I was very tempted to go running after it. I feel like I might vomit....

He didn't cry... Even after I got off and he doors closed... But he might be crying now.... :(
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Offline Hypowoman90

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Re: I wsa fine for a couple of weeks. Fear of my son being austic.
« Reply #23 on: August 23, 2014, 08:23:49 PM »
Just an update on my son. i have noticed some improvements over the summer.
He has more words now and makes more attempts to speak. If he is having trouble saying a word, or can't say it at all,he prompts me to say the word to him a couple of times by pointing to my mouth and watching the movements my  mouth makes when I say them. He can follow most directions. He also recently started answering Yes or No questions sometimes.

This happened  without having any formal speech therapy (no services in the summer ) so I an cautiously trying to gain some optimism. If he made those improvements without help then I am hoping  getting it now will make a huge difference.
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