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Author Topic: Sertraline  (Read 350 times)

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Offline rodan

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Sertraline
« on: April 06, 2014, 05:17:39 PM »
I've just started my first med for my anxiety depression ( my counselor is still trying to figure out what my anxieties are with some interviews and tests ), sertraline ( Zoloft ) 50 mg.

Today is day 48, almost seven weeks.   Just three days ago, I am experiencing a different sort of feeling, though, I can't put my finger on it, whether it's good, or, just neutral. I feel like I'm sort of more aware, or something.

Thinking about asking doctor to increase to 75 mg.  I was on 75 mg for just a few days, about three weeks ago, but, it was really causing some anxiety and sleep problems, so, went back to 50 mg.

Is it possible, now that it's been seven weeks, I could go up to 75 mg, and, see some improvement in my anxiety, for the better? Or,  maybe the 50 mg is working, only rather slowly?
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Offline MobileChucko

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Re: Sertraline
« Reply #1 on: April 06, 2014, 06:14:48 PM »
Hi Rodan, and welcome to Anxiety Zone...

Zoloft (Sertraline) is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) class anti-depressant.  When starting a SSRI or increasing the dose of one, such as you going from 50 mg to 75 mg, serotonin levels are increased immediately.  This can cause some temporary side effects in some individuals.  These can include an increase in anxiety and insomnia.  These side effects usually only last a few weeks, as the body adjusts to the medication, or increase in medication.

So, if you do decide to increase your Zoloft to 75 mg, you might see some side effects, but hang-on as they shouldn't last long.

The very best to you, Rodan!...  Chuck :grinning-smiley-003:
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Offline rodan

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Re: Sertraline
« Reply #2 on: April 07, 2014, 08:31:10 AM »
At four weeks, my family doctor wanted to switch me to Paxil.  He thought it should be doing something by four weeks.  My counselor, at that time, thought I should go from 50 mg to 75 mg. She says the clients she sees, usually are on higher dosages to do any good.  I called the doctor, he was ok with that. I tried 75 mg, for a few days, as it was really difficult for me to sleep, and, I got some slight tremors with it, at night, with sweats.

This is when I went back to 50 mg.   

I guess what's in my mind, right now, should I give 75 mg a try again, before I give up on sertraline and switch to Paxil.  I'm leaning on sticking with this sertraline, but, just not sure of the dosage. 

Since I do think it just might be starting to work, I'd hate to give up on it.

Any suggestions or experiences from anyone on Zoloft, Lustral, or generic sertraline, please share. Thank you.
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Offline stevo1111

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Re: Sertraline
« Reply #3 on: April 07, 2014, 10:43:37 AM »
I would increase the dose to at least 150mg and hold there for 6-8 weeks before making an opinion on Sertaline. 50mg often not enough for most, with some going beyond the maximum recommended dose. If you are past the initial break in period, give it a full run before you switch and go through the break in period again, at least my 2 cents.
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Offline insights

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Re: Sertraline
« Reply #4 on: April 07, 2014, 06:05:43 PM »
I tried 75 mg, for a few days, as it was really difficult for me to sleep, and, I got some slight tremors with it, at night, with sweats.

This is when I went back to 50 mg.   

All antidepressants may produce such side-effects when the dose is increased. Paxil will be no different. 50mg sertraline is usually the minimum therapeutic dose, but most need to take 100-150mg for good results. IMHO, you should go up to 75mg for 7-10 days and then to 100mg, as 75mg is likely to be no more effective than 50mg.

Taking to much of a SSRI does no harm, the brain just ignores the extra, but taking too little for long periods can increase the possibility that the med will stop working.

Ian
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NOTE: I'm not a doctor, and particularly not yours, so there may be factors I'm unaware of. Therefore all advice is of a general nature and you should consult your doctor before following any of it, especially before changing med doses.

Offline rodan

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Re: Sertraline
« Reply #5 on: April 08, 2014, 08:59:20 AM »
I tried 75 mg, for a few days, as it was really difficult for me to sleep, and, I got some slight tremors with it, at night, with sweats.

This is when I went back to 50 mg.   

All antidepressants may produce such side-effects when the dose is increased. Paxil will be no different. 50mg sertraline is usually the minimum therapeutic dose, but most need to take 100-150mg for good results. IMHO, you should go up to 75mg for 7-10 days and then to 100mg, as 75mg is likely to be no more effective than 50mg.

Taking to much of a SSRI does no harm, the brain just ignores the extra, but taking too little for long periods can increase the possibility that the med will stop working.

Ian

I guess my thinking is the less I take, for the results I want, does less harm to my physical body. Maybe that is not the case.  Getting more anxious, sweats, insomnia, mild tremors, when I was on 75 mg for a few days, made me think my body was trying to warn me to back off.  I don't know.

I did go from 50 mg to 75 mg, yesterday, and, planned on keeping at that dose for a few days, to see how my body handles it. 

Maybe the body can get used to the sertraline, going up, 25 mg, at a time?  I do want to give it a chanceto work, rather than switching meds every few weeks to see what works.

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Offline Abraham2007

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Re: Sertraline
« Reply #6 on: April 08, 2014, 01:40:03 PM »
Quote

I guess my thinking is the less I take, for the results I want, does less harm to my physical body. Maybe that is not the case.  Getting more anxious, sweats, insomnia, mild tremors, when I was on 75 mg for a few days, made me think my body was trying to warn me to back off.  I don't know.


Complaints that arise from antidepressants being harmful, often come from users who don't take their medications appropriately, as prescribed by their doctors.  Careless users tend to skip dosages, wean themselves off the med without telling their doctors, or have misinformed beliefs that antidepressants are deadly.   So they make negative claims about these medications, while influencing users like yourself in benefiting from an antidepressant, such as Setraline.

Raising an antidepressant (from 50mg to 75mg to 100mg) will always require your body to adjust.  You should be discussing these side effects with your doctor, so your doctor can soothe your nerves on how this medication is working in your system.  Don't make conclusions --- meaning don't make up false beliefs about antidepressants - without consenting with a trained professional who knows how these medications work.


Quote

Maybe the body can get used to the sertraline, going up, 25 mg, at a time?  I do want to give it a chanceto work, rather than switching meds every few weeks to see what works.


Switching meds based on fear, rather than based on trust with your doctor, needs evaluation on your part.   Antidepressants are very useful, however you may need to invest more time being exposed to the pros of antidepressants, rather than its cons.


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Offline insights

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Re: Sertraline
« Reply #7 on: April 08, 2014, 06:07:31 PM »
I guess my thinking is the less I take, for the results I want, does less harm to my physical body. Maybe that is not the case.

Antidepressants work by encouraging the growth of new brain cells to replace those killed or prevented from growing by chronic exposure to stress hormones, particularly cortisol, and by strengthening interconnections between brain regions. However, you need to take enough to initiate and sustain this process. Taking less than you need can 'train' the brain to ignore the med increasing the odds of it pooping-out.

There is also little evidence that SSRIs cause long term harm, and some that they are beneficial. Most of the serotonergic antidepressants will slightly thin the blood reducing the incidence of heart attacks and ischemic stroke, there is also evidence that they can reduce the buildup of neural plaque associated with Alzheimer's dementia.

Bottom line: Stress is our biggest killer by far. Anything you can do to reduce it will extend your life expectancy and improve its quality. 

Quote
Maybe the body can get used to the sertraline, going up, 25 mg, at a time?

Sure, or even 12.5mg if you need to.

Quote
I do want to give it a chanceto work, rather than switching meds every few weeks to see what works.

Most of the SSRIs and SNRIs will produce similar side-effects initially, or when upping the dose. You're unlikely to find an antidepressant without these side-effects. The only treatment without them are the cognitive and/or behavioural and/or mindfulness therapies. They are about as effective as antidepressants, but cost more if not adequately covered by health insurance.

Ian
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NOTE: I'm not a doctor, and particularly not yours, so there may be factors I'm unaware of. Therefore all advice is of a general nature and you should consult your doctor before following any of it, especially before changing med doses.

Offline rodan

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Re: Sertraline
« Reply #8 on: April 09, 2014, 09:46:44 AM »
Thanks to all for the advice. I'm a lot more at ease about increasing dosage and giving sertraline a chance to work.  So far, going from 50 to 75 mg i notice no additional side effects. Maybe the doctor will let me go from 75 to 100 in a few days, depending on how I do.
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Offline rodan

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Re: Sertraline
« Reply #9 on: April 20, 2014, 11:07:41 AM »
I would increase the dose to at least 150mg and hold there for 6-8 weeks before making an opinion on Sertaline. 50mg often not enough for most, with some going beyond the maximum recommended dose. If you are past the initial break in period, give it a full run before you switch and go through the break in period again, at least my 2 cents.

I've started at 50 mg sertraline February 18th.  Went to 75mg April 7th. Then t o 100 mg April 13th.  Altogether, I've been on sertraline for 62 days straight, always taking it midafternoon, with the exception of the first time I was put on 75 mg for a week, and asked to take it in the morning. When I did that, I couldn't sleep at night. Then, went back to 50mg, March 24th,( taking it midafternoon again ) for about twelve days, then, increased to
75mg, then, to 100mg, which I have now been at for eight days.

If it's had any positive effect on me, I haven't noticed. I'm not worse, but, I'm not better, prior to taking this drug. ( I've never been on antidepressants before, with the exception of being on Lexapro, for 45 days, which didn't help at all, although now I know you need to be on these for a while before they work. I didn't know that back then. I think I quit the Lexapro because my anxiety got worse being on it.

Since I've been on it, I was given a written, multiple choice test, for AADD, and, I tested positive for it ( 75 ).
The counselor told me my doctor may put me on a drug for that.  My anxiety may be from my inability to focus, not completing even simple tasks, without wondering off to the next.

She thinks I may be given Ritalin, which, I've read increases the dopamine and serotonin levels in the brain.

This gets me thinking since sertraline affects these neurotransmitters, too,  is it possible, given enough dosage and time, this drug would produce positive results for my AADD?
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Offline insights

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Re: Sertraline
« Reply #10 on: April 20, 2014, 06:22:40 PM »
She thinks I may be given Ritalin, which, I've read increases the dopamine and serotonin levels in the brain.

This gets me thinking since sertraline affects these neurotransmitters, too,  is it possible, given enough dosage and time, this drug would produce positive results for my AADD?

It may do to a small extent. However, antidepressants do not increase brain levels of dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin as Ritalin does, they actually reduce their synthesis and expression after a few weeks.

I'd get a second opinion on the AADD before starting treatment, preferably from a psychiatrist.

Ian
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NOTE: I'm not a doctor, and particularly not yours, so there may be factors I'm unaware of. Therefore all advice is of a general nature and you should consult your doctor before following any of it, especially before changing med doses.

Offline rodan

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Re: Sertraline
« Reply #11 on: April 21, 2014, 08:30:33 AM »
She thinks I may be given Ritalin, which, I've read increases the dopamine and serotonin levels in the brain.

This gets me thinking since sertraline affects these neurotransmitters, too,  is it possible, given enough dosage and time, this drug would produce positive results for my AADD?

It may do to a small extent. However, antidepressants do not increase brain levels of dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin as Ritalin does, they actually reduce their synthesis and expression after a few weeks.

I'd get a second opinion on the AADD before starting treatment, preferably from a psychiatrist.

Ian

My counselor, at my first visit, mentioned I would have an appointment with a psychiatrist, but, that hasn't happened yet.  I will suggest that too her, before going on any AADD type of drugs.
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