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Author Topic: Lá Fhéile Pádraig Sona Daoibh  (Read 418 times)

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Offline Cuchculan

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Re: Lá Fhéile Pádraig Sona Daoibh
« Reply #10 on: March 23, 2014, 07:52:16 AM »
One thing I love about both traditions / cultures is the Cairns. I know they can found all over the world these days. But way back when they were meant to have been made by Clans going off to fight. Each fighter would place a rock on the Cairn. More for protection. When they returned, if they returned, they each removed a rock. Good Gaelic saying ' Cuiridh mi clach air do chàrn, "I'll put a stone on your cairn". More a blessing to protect the Clans men. The stones that remained when the fighters returned were turned into a full size Cairn to remember the dead. Sort of history that interests me big time. Here in Ireland we have , Dún Aonghasa, an all-stone Iron Age Irish hill fort on Inishmore in the Aran Islands. It is still surrounded by small cairns and strategically placed jutting rocks, used collectively as an alternative to defensive earthworks because of the karst landscape's lack of soil. They still play a role even today.
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Offline GenSec

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Re: Lá Fhéile Pádraig Sona Daoibh
« Reply #11 on: March 25, 2014, 11:21:28 AM »
Oh, i never knew that little ancient story about the Cairns. :winking0008: If we head out from where we live on the main road we pass one on top of a tall hill, and staring at it i've sometimes asked how it got there. Deep down, i prefer keeping it a mystery rather than spoiling it with facts!

If we head out the other way toward the city, then we get to admire Bennachie, where, on the top of Mither Tap, is an Iron Age fort. Its a distinctive low lying mountain (its called a hill but many will tell you it isn't really) because its flat on top. I remember going up there as a child. Since then its got its own visitors centre and all sorts of Visit Scotland stuff. Excavations have revealed a decent sized community living there for quite a long period, for many centuries most likely. Its also surrounded by ancient standing stones. It all dominates the skyline, and when my ex first seen it she was well impressed with the scenery and it as the backdrop.

I came across these reviews of it on a website about this sort of thing... having grown up with it always around me in some form or another whenever i head on a journey, it strikes me how odd it is these people find it so special! :laugh3:

http://www.themodernantiquarian.com/site/7508/mither_tap.html

The Iron Age fort on the Aran Islands looks so isolated! Who was fighting way out there enough to need a fort to protect themselves!? :laugh3: Then again, judging by the hill forts dotted around Ireland and Scotland i get the impression we tended to a spirited bunch who enjoyed a good fight, heh!

The ancient Irish though get to claim one speciality which they introduced us to though... gold artwork. The Celts from Ireland who settled on the west coast introduced to the peoples on this side of the water amazing artwork skills in gold smithing which rival anything the Romans ever produced. In fact it were the Irish Celts who converted us stubbornly Pagan Picts to Christianity, lol. :angel-smiley-006:

I often wonder about the linguistics... i'd really like to know if Pictish was similar to Gaelic. Did the two sides easily understand each other? Picts and Celts often fought each other, but then again they often fought amongst themselves and at times of crisis (usually external enemies such as Vikings or tribes from farther south) they seemed able to come together. Some say Pictish would have been similar to ancient Welsh but others say it may have been an even older language on the British Isles. Its a pity they never once developed writing so that they could have bequeathed us something that was written down with it for us to see and know.

I like how Ireland seems to have retained more of its Gaelic heritage than we have... more of our places are named using later Anglo-Scots terms loosely based on the Gaelic original, or sometimes make absolutely no sense because they poorly copied the sound of the original Gaelic name without bothering to learn what it actually meant.



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Offline Cuchculan

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Re: Lá Fhéile Pádraig Sona Daoibh
« Reply #12 on: March 25, 2014, 02:51:24 PM »
Don't forget that the Celts were not the first people here. So the Pictish language was also said to be used in Ireland before Gaelic. Fair to say we belong to a warrior race of people. If I do recall the film Centurion it was the so called Pictish language been used in that film. The Romans were afraid to travel too far North because of the Warriors. But a few had to to reclaim something stolen from the Romans. The Pictish were brought across as a somewhat untamed warrior race of people. They used subtitles in the film. But some words I could understand. I would guess they were using a fair bit of Gaelic mixed with some other language to bring about this new language for the film. Here in Ireland we had the Gaels. We also had this odd bunch of people called an fir blog. The Fir Blog I would say is pure myth. The story behind them is that they were meant to be slaves in Greece of all places. On an island. They stitched their water sacks together and escaped. Somehow ending up in Ireland. Little bit over the top if you ask me. Sweet story all the same.

On the Islands on the West Coast of Ireland is a shell of an old, well, not church as such, but a place were monks used to live. It is one amazing structure. The way they built it into the hills. This small island would get lashed out of it by Atlantic winds. It is not a place anybody lives on today. It would have been hand made. I simply couldn't even imagine people been able to build anything like it today. I think those sort of skills are long since lost. Irish TV used to try and film old ways of living when TV first came out. Programme called Hands. Might be able to find it on you tube. Skilled workers doing things by hand. No machines. Amazing watching them work. Lived a simple life and were happy as they were.

#Invalid YouTube Link#
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