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Author Topic: When to trust the doctors  (Read 906 times)

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Offline emily1994

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Re: When to trust the doctors
« Reply #10 on: March 03, 2014, 03:30:08 PM »
I worry that something grew within that time or was too small to be seen at the time I had the MRI, especially since there was no contrast. I also had the neurologist look at the films, so I really have no choice but to accept this, I guess...
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Offline Kindra11

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Re: When to trust the doctors
« Reply #11 on: March 03, 2014, 03:32:06 PM »
Just a thought on the random tinnitus, pay attention and see if you clench your jaw. I started having random tinnitus and it turns out because of anxiety I clench my teeth a lot ( didn't notice it until my dentist told me) which will cause tinnitus and can affect your eyes. Maybe see your dentist and get checked for tmj  :action-smiley-065:
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Broken, But Not Destroyed

Offline clippergoodwill

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Re: When to trust the doctors
« Reply #12 on: March 03, 2014, 03:34:11 PM »
My understanding of the contrast, is that it's used to track the flow of blood through your arteries in your head during a brain scan. MRI imaging is really good without it, and the contrast dye only highlights where the blood was flowing. Everything else is still very visible without it.
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Offline emily1994

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Re: When to trust the doctors
« Reply #13 on: March 03, 2014, 03:52:54 PM »
The thing that worries me is knowing that the MRI was months ago, so something could have very well been too small to see back in November, and recently grew, causing these visual problems. I even think I had a hallucination last night, if you read my other forum post!

I just can't accept that nothing is wrong.
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Offline floridaguy65

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Re: When to trust the doctors
« Reply #14 on: March 03, 2014, 03:56:25 PM »
Yeah, it is hard... I am on Prozac, but I'm not quite sure it's working. I have another psychiatrist appointment this week, so hopefully I can get this sorted out. I just wish these symptoms would go away  :fragend005:

Hi e:) I'm glad you're getting some professional help. Most of us need it (or have needed it) at one point or another in our 'anxiety journey'. From there, it really will be our own self-help that keeps us moving down our healing path longer-term. The things we learn in counseling / therapy must be practiced and embraced by us. We should add our own actions, habits and mindsets into the mix, as well. We must, ultimately, take control over our healing path. No rush, though....don't get too far ahead of ourselves in seeking out some lasting peace. We think, "Damn, I just wanna be ME again...I wanna get better NOW...I HAVE TO get better NOW!" Of course, patience is not really a best buddy for us anxiety peeps....that is for sure:) A healing path is a process...it takes some time to learn what's even going on in our bodies and minds due to our anxiety issues. When struggling us HA folk tend to discount the power of the mind to exacerbate physical manifestations and, even, create them, as well. I am not amazed by anxiety anymore. I understand there is little outside the boundaries of where hyper-anxiety can lead our minds and where it can take our bodies. And, from there, a hyper-amped up brain and nervous system and body systems need time to 'come down' from their manic state, so to speak. Even when we are feeling pretty good one day, we will all of a sudden realize a niggling pain and ache or have an event happen (a skipped heart beat - a flash of light - a buzz zap in the brain, etc) and we are off to the races again wondering what bad is going in our bods. This 'up and down' of being hyper that we go through on pretty much a daily basis (or hourly basis even) when we are struggling continues to build and build until we reach a point where we really feel we just can't take it anymore...we feel there will never be a period in our lives where we aren't heavily affected by anxiety / health anxiety.

I call HA the  'doubting disease' sometimes. We tend to doubt many things, when struggling. We doubt Docs and medical testing. We doubt that our case is just a 'normal anxiety disorder case' and we will be THE ONE who actually does have that awful disease / illness. We doubt our future possibilities of living well as we see ourselves ALWAYS struggling with anxiety. We doubt our ability to know if what we are doing is best for our anxiety treatment. We doubt that we will ever be the major definer of our overall well-being and that anxiety will always call a majority of the shots. Doubt is pervasive. Doubt is powerful. And, this doubt will drive us into fear cycles where we end up repeating bad habits and counterproductive actions.

A very counterproductive action is seeking out repeat testing and repeat med intervention when we have been told by Docs (usually many) that there is nothing physiologically sinister that is the major root cause of our struggles (symptoms - pain -worry).

What's going on in your psych visits, if you don't mind sharing?

What type of self-help do you do....or aware of?

Do you have family support?

What meds are you on? Have taken?

Sorry to fire off so many questions:) Many peeps here can offer up some pretty darn good advice. You've gotten a lot already:)

Peace and Feel Well:)
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Offline emily1994

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Re: When to trust the doctors
« Reply #15 on: March 03, 2014, 04:09:36 PM »
I have only been to the psychiatrist one time, and my second appointment is on Thursday of this week. I did see a psychologist three times, but I had to cancel my last appointment and she never got back to me, so I don't go anymore.

I don't discuss my anxiety with anyone anymore, so I don't get support besides on here. I have struggled for months, and my family has way too much going on now for me to start bringing up my problems again.

As for self help, I try to clean the house and keep myself busy when I am anxious, which works sometimes. I am in a better place than I was a few months ago, and maybe the Prozac I am on is helping.

However, I don't understand how I can just let this go when I keep having these red flag symptoms. I guess I just have to wait it out, but I'm truly tired of this.
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Offline floridaguy65

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Re: When to trust the doctors
« Reply #16 on: March 04, 2014, 09:18:55 AM »
I have only been to the psychiatrist one time, and my second appointment is on Thursday of this week. I did see a psychologist three times, but I had to cancel my last appointment and she never got back to me, so I don't go anymore.

OK, good. Discuss everything during your upcoming psych visit. Nothing will sound wacky to a pysch, so go ahead and get it all out in the open. There will be things you can learn from your Doc about how to help yourself. There is also much you can study on your own. Get some anxiety books, IMHO. Use the search feature here on The AZ, as books for anxiety has been a thread many times.


I don't discuss my anxiety with anyone anymore, so I don't get support besides on here. I have struggled for months, and my family has way too much going on now for me to start bringing up my problems again.

Understand. It is tough, sometimes, relaying our anxiety to family members and friends. They can be sympathetic (to a point and even they get weary of it, often), but they can't really 'get it' unless they have struggled, as well. If there comes a time where you feel the opportunity is open to discuss with one family member or a good friend, then you might consider this. Keeping things all bottled up can be frustrating. But, trying to explain our mental health challenges can be exasperating for us, and we can feel some guilt and embarrassment, at times, as well. Tough call, often, on our parts if we want to 'lean' on family and friends, a bit for a little support, here and there. One thing that might be useful is, in your course of getting some informational anxiety material (books, mags, online articles, etc), you can, perhaps, share some of this with a family member to allow them to, hopefully, get a little better grasp on what you might be going through. MANY peeps struggle with anxiety. But for those who do not, there is very little knowledge of anxiety disorders / health anxiety and this lack of understanding might cause them to 'roll their eyes', sometimes....which is very frustrating to us anxiety peeps. Don't expect other people to 'get it'....but what you would like to expect from others is the simple respect that what you are relaying as far as what you are feeling (physically) and thinking is true...you aren't just making stuff up. This IS how you currently feel. And, you simply can't 'snap' out of it....or you would be a snappin' machine:)


As for self help, I try to clean the house and keep myself busy when I am anxious, which works sometimes. I am in a better place than I was a few months ago, and maybe the Prozac I am on is helping.

When there is something big and bad and sinister going on in our bods, distraction really doesn't work to keep the symptoms at bay. A brain tumor could care less if you're cleaning the house or driving or singing in the shower:) Brain tumors aren't 'willy nilly'. Anxiety sure can be, though. It is a wonderful sign that you can get lost in a chore or hobby or a good day, at times.....and this is incredibly common with anxiety issues:)


However, I don't understand how I can just let this go when I keep having these red flag symptoms. I guess I just have to wait it out, but I'm truly tired of this.

Sure, you're tired of it. Nobody wants to have to deal with anxiety. But, ultimately, we HAVE TO if we want to live well alongside our challenges. And, we CAN live so very well despite have HA / ADs:). 'Letting go', so to speak, is a vital part of our healing path. Acceptance is another word to use. Acceptance is never resignation - never. Acceptance isn't a passive measure, really, either. It involves embracing appropriate actions, habits and mindsets and learning how to best get ourselves moving down a viable healing path. At its core, acceptance means NOT fighting 'tooth and nail' against your anxiety (your makeup), but realizing that this stuff is part of you and you'll have to cognizant that there are things you'll have to do to keep it from creating lifeflow interruptions, at times. These techniques and actions can become quite natural and they do not have to always be a painstaking effort. We, often, visualize in our future having to ALWAYS be painfully giving a huge amount of our time and resources in our journey towards lasting solace. Doesn't have to always be that way - at all:)

Peace and Feel Well:)
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