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Author Topic: Acceptance and Commitment therapy...anyone using this technique?  (Read 175 times)

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Online AncientMelody

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Just curious who was involved in this one. I have been addressing only my anxiety, considering my depressive symptoms merely a "side effect" of the anxiety and therefore not dealing with them seperately. Well after a bad episode last week, I'm reconsidering that. My psychiatrist loaned me "The Mindfulness and Acceptance Workbook for Depression" so I've been reading through it.

What I like about it: the focus on "values based living" A lot of that really resonates with me. I honestly feel that if I'd never developed full blown anxiety/depression, there would be negative attributes in my life, thoughts that are hindering me to a smaller degree that I'd never get around to working on. This has forced me to do that. I've also been practicing mindfulness already so some of this is an extension of that.

On the other hand, I can't completely "buy in" to it because I don't want to accept this level of mental health symptoms on a long term basis. I wouldn't have reached THIS point without the lexapro.

So I'm incorporating some aspects....I think on a short term basis, two or three months, I can and will stay where I'm at on the Lexapro. So a short term acceptance if you will. This will allow me time to continue to put healthy lifestyle changes into practice and make them habit. THEN if I am still not where I'd like to be, I'll talk about a medication change or dose adjustment. (exceptions being if 1) my psychiatrist recommends med adjustment, I want to follow her advice, or someone else in my life indicates significant concern, etc.
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Offline i960

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Re: Acceptance and Commitment therapy...anyone using this technique?
« Reply #1 on: January 16, 2014, 09:11:06 PM »
Quote
I don't want to accept this level of mental health symptoms on a long term basis.

That's pretty much it right there though isn't it?

The only way to make it not long term is to completely accept it though. What's the problem with accepting it entirely so that you can get on the path to recovery? These things are chicken/egg type situations where recovery cannot being until acceptance happens. Once recovery begins and starts becoming successful you'll wonder what you ever had to accept - as the negative feelings usually greatly recede by then.
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Online AncientMelody

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Re: Acceptance and Commitment therapy...anyone using this technique?
« Reply #2 on: January 16, 2014, 09:31:02 PM »
Well, I accept that I have anxiety, I accept that this is a long term condition. However, what I mean is that I'm not completely closing myself off to medications adjustments down the road if I or my psychiatrist feels it is warranted.
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Offline maple

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Re: Acceptance and Commitment therapy...anyone using this technique?
« Reply #3 on: January 17, 2014, 02:32:48 PM »
While I'm not familiar with ACT directly, I have taken Mindfulness courses (which is what ACT is partially based on).  In mindfulness, the practice is to bring as much acceptance, kindness, and gentleness to each moment, and to take good care of yourself.  What I like about it is that you don't need to accept something like anxiety or depression as a chronic condition; you just need to accept that at this moment in time, you are suffering, and that you are doing what you can to take care of yourself (whether it be medication, exercise, yoga, acupuncture, or whatever else gives you some peace).  It makes sense, because all we really have or know is this moment; we have no idea how we'll feel tomorrow, next week, next month, or next year.  It's when we start to worrying or trying to predict how we'll feel tomorrow/next week/next year that we start to spin into those spirals of doubt, anxiety, and depression. 

I say this as someone who as an anxiety disorder, and is still working on finding treatment that works.  Mindfulness helps but has not been the magic bullet; to be honest, I don't think there is one.  But mindfulness helps with perspective.
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