Chat Now!   Member Gallery   Anxiety Zone Wire   Games   Social Groups   AZ Member Blogs   Health News  Bored?

Author Topic: Health anxiety and reassurance-seeking as addiction  (Read 614 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline MrMoleHill

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 453
  • Country: us
  • Rec's: 5
  • Gender: Male
  • Mood: Okay
    Okay
  • I look, therefore I find.
    • Poke This Member
Re: Health anxiety and reassurance-seeking as addiction
« Reply #15 on: January 09, 2014, 10:15:45 AM »
Regarding reassurance, I definitely know that I have deep issues with insecurity.  It's something else I'm trying to work on, in addition to the anxiety and the HA.
Bookmark and Share
We are all walking through the Valley of the Shadow of Death

Offline AncientMelody

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 466
  • Rec's: 9
  • Personal text
    • Poke This Member
Re: Health anxiety and reassurance-seeking as addiction
« Reply #16 on: January 09, 2014, 10:49:53 AM »
Yes, Molehill, it's good you're working on it. I would say that's critical as I think that very insecurity can play a role in the development of our anxiety disorders. Severe work stress and hormones finally pushed me over into a clinically significant disorder, but I feel my insecurities and passivity very much were the groundwork and were there long before.
Bookmark and Share

Offline Air Nomad

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 173
  • Country: us
  • Rec's: 0
  • Gender: Female
  • Mood: Worried
    Worried
  • Personal text
    • Poke This Member
Re: Health anxiety and reassurance-seeking as addiction
« Reply #17 on: January 09, 2014, 03:26:42 PM »
Wow, I never thought of it that way but you are absolutely 100% right!  It is an addiction and I do at times feel like an addict.  My health anxiety is debilitating and I feel like I need just one more "hit" of the reassurance drug and then I'll be fine... until the next time.  Maybe thinking of it that way will be helpful to some people in overcoming it, since it makes it a little more tangible so to speak.  Thanks for sharing this!
Bookmark and Share
Sokka: "Do you want me to be like you or be totally honest?"
Katara: "Are you saying I'm a liar?"
Sokka: "No, I'm saying you're an optimist. Same thing really."
-Avatar: the Last Airbender
(This is me and my husband to a tee)

Offline atleswoolf

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 141
  • Country: us
  • Rec's: 1
  • Gender: Male
  • Personal text
    • Poke This Member
Re: Health anxiety and reassurance-seeking as addiction
« Reply #18 on: January 09, 2014, 03:46:06 PM »
Glad you found it helpful, Air Nomad.  The more I think about it today, the more it rings true.  I've been home alone all day (I go back to teaching on Monday), and I've been fretting and worrying and obsessing, and have almost picked up the phone to call people to chill myself out, and have kept saying, "That's just like the alcoholic taking the first drink."  It sort of stops me and makes me think about what I'm doing.
Bookmark and Share
I meant to write about death, only life came breaking in as usual.  -- Virginia Woolf, Diary, 17 February 1922.

Offline atleswoolf

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 141
  • Country: us
  • Rec's: 1
  • Gender: Male
  • Personal text
    • Poke This Member
Re: Health anxiety and reassurance-seeking as addiction
« Reply #19 on: January 24, 2014, 07:55:36 PM »
A bit more on this topic.  I'm currently teaching a course on diary-writing, using a textbook by Tristine Rainer called THE NEW DIARY.  In it, she describes how writing in a journal (a small book she carried everywhere, literally) helped her kick her addiction to cigarettes.  She'd pull it out when she wanted a cigarette, noted the time, and what she was thinking or feeling or doing that made her want the cigarette.  She claims that eventually it helped her quit.  I thought about this in terms of CBT, and of health addiction.  For the last week, I've been carrying around a small notebook in my pocket, and jotting down every time a health anxiety thought enters my head, and have been examining what brings them on.  As per usual, it's when I'm lonely or have too much time on my hands.  My "symptoms" disappear when I'm busy.  I was on campus all day on Wednesday, teaching, having meetings, auditioning students for a play...and I had no anxiety whatsoever.  It's only this evening, when I'm home alone, that it reappears.  Not a coincidence.  The journaling is helping me to recognize that.  Also, I find that bluntly asking myself the following question in the journal really helps:  "What exactly are you avoiding by focusing on health anxiety?"  Once I've identified what it is, I then write, "Now go do that."  I find that it's helping, slowly. 
Bookmark and Share
I meant to write about death, only life came breaking in as usual.  -- Virginia Woolf, Diary, 17 February 1922.

Tags:
 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
10 Replies
2399 Views
Last post February 21, 2007, 03:55:21 PM
by Skunk
4 Replies
2575 Views
Last post February 26, 2010, 05:25:46 PM
by ocdengineer
4 Replies
1579 Views
Last post April 20, 2010, 03:38:54 PM
by wolfie1030
2 Replies
482 Views
Last post January 19, 2011, 10:25:36 AM
by marc
3 Replies
1087 Views
Last post May 16, 2011, 09:12:48 PM
by FearfulOne
1 Replies
335 Views
Last post June 01, 2013, 12:48:23 PM
by vanilla1969