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Author Topic: Great anxiety story in The Atlantic  (Read 430 times)

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Offline anxiousartist

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I'm working on being happy with what I can do, rather than sad for what I cannot do

Offline GhostlyBagel

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Re: Great anxiety story in The Atlantic
« Reply #1 on: January 09, 2014, 02:11:21 PM »
Reading it over now. One question, though: did you write this or someone else?
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Online tinam7

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Re: Great anxiety story in The Atlantic
« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2014, 08:42:03 AM »
This is one fantastic article, nothing less than a comprehensive study of anxiety from the age of 2. Wish I could memorize it to be able to quote it to others.

The author is Scott Stossel, no less a luminary than the editor of The Atlantic. It is his story which did not stop him in his life. A great inspiration. Thank you for sharing this. Maybe we can find a way to highlight what is a lengthy report that addresses many aspects of this almost mystifying condition.
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Offline anxiousartist

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Re: Great anxiety story in The Atlantic
« Reply #3 on: January 11, 2014, 09:19:14 PM »
Reading it over now. One question, though: did you write this or someone else?

No, I didn't write it
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I'm working on being happy with what I can do, rather than sad for what I cannot do

Offline anxiousartist

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Re: Great anxiety story in The Atlantic
« Reply #4 on: January 11, 2014, 09:27:11 PM »
This is one fantastic article, nothing less than a comprehensive study of anxiety from the age of 2. Wish I could memorize it to be able to quote it to others.

The author is Scott Stossel, no less a luminary than the editor of The Atlantic. It is his story which did not stop him in his life. A great inspiration. Thank you for sharing this. Maybe we can find a way to highlight what is a lengthy report that addresses many aspects of this almost mystifying condition.

It's amazing how successful he was able to become with the level of anxiety he experiences. He mentioned he's tried everything, but he didn't say he's tried exercise. IMO exercise is the best treatment for my anxiety.

Benzos work if I don't take them regularly. Alcohol works for a short time then I feel worse, and you shouldn't drive if you drink. So alcohol has its limitations, but exercise and a steam room afterwards works great for me, along with living a healthy lifestyle in general i.e. no smoking; no fried; foods; very little sugar; ec cetera

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I'm working on being happy with what I can do, rather than sad for what I cannot do

Offline Doxie Lover

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Re: Great anxiety story in The Atlantic
« Reply #5 on: January 11, 2014, 10:02:33 PM »
Long but great article.  Despite all his multiple and horrific experiences, he managed to become successful, working for a leading magazine.  I'd say that he kind of "lucked out" somehow.  My anxiety has actually caused career standstill.  I'm amazed at how his anxiety hadn't gotten in the way of his success.  I wish I knew the secret.
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Offline anxiousartist

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Re: Great anxiety story in The Atlantic
« Reply #6 on: January 11, 2014, 10:14:26 PM »
Long but great article.  Despite all his multiple and horrific experiences, he managed to become successful, working for a leading magazine.  I'd say that he kind of "lucked out" somehow.  My anxiety has actually caused career standstill.  I'm amazed at how his anxiety hadn't gotten in the way of his success.  I wish I knew the secret.

Me too.

My whole career revolves around my anxiety. I was going to be a teacher, but I couldn't do it due to the anxiety. Oh well, I'm probably better off for it. I really didn't like school. I don't know why I would want to spend any more time in an institutional setting than I have to.

What do you do?
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I'm working on being happy with what I can do, rather than sad for what I cannot do

Online tinam7

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Re: Great anxiety story in The Atlantic
« Reply #7 on: January 12, 2014, 08:27:30 AM »
Not to interrupt, want to add that I so agree re exercise, traditional and otherwise. But we must remember he had digestion issues, fear of throwing up which can be a deterrent. Tai Chi might have worked for him.

He makes a notable case for the combination of nature and nurture doing its part, even in the womb which I always thought to be true. The stress hormones of the mother circulate to the fetus. The conflicting parents. Divorce, etc. The article is adapted from his new book My Age of Anxiety recently published. There is too much sitting here waiting to be read, but this is on my list. For now the article still keeps me busy.
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Offline anxiousartist

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Re: Great anxiety story in The Atlantic
« Reply #8 on: January 12, 2014, 12:06:03 PM »
Not to interrupt, want to add that I so agree re exercise, traditional and otherwise. But we must remember he had digestion issues, fear of throwing up which can be a deterrent. Tai Chi might have worked for him.

He makes a notable case for the combination of nature and nurture doing its part, even in the womb which I always thought to be true. The stress hormones of the mother circulate to the fetus. The conflicting parents. Divorce, etc. The article is adapted from his new book My Age of Anxiety recently published. There is too much sitting here waiting to be read, but this is on my list. For now the article still keeps me busy.

I think you're right. Also, some people are more anxious about some situations than others, some people aren't anxious at all in some situations, but are anxious in other situations.

I'm extremely anxious around a boss, but I'm not anxious at all at the gym. I know some people are terrified of gyms.

I think he's right about nature and nurture. My mom divorced my dad when I was one and she's naturally highly anxious and depressed anyways. So obviously it was an especially highly anxious time before I was born.
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I'm working on being happy with what I can do, rather than sad for what I cannot do

Online tinam7

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Re: Great anxiety story in The Atlantic
« Reply #9 on: January 12, 2014, 04:30:43 PM »
Am so glad you called attention to the article. Now you even agree re the womb issue and divorce matter. The circumstances during my womb time were so bad I emerged knowing I did not want to be born or live. As to divorce, I've lost many an attempt to argue that much needs to be done to preserve a marriage once there is a child.

Of course now I must get the book. It is on order in the library. For now I'm still reading (no, studying) the article.
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Offline Doxie Lover

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Re: Great anxiety story in The Atlantic
« Reply #10 on: January 12, 2014, 11:34:18 PM »
Me too.

My whole career revolves around my anxiety. I was going to be a teacher, but I couldn't do it due to the anxiety. Oh well, I'm probably better off for it. I really didn't like school. I don't know why I would want to spend any more time in an institutional setting than I have to.

What do you do?
[/quote]

I am in human resources but my anxiety keeps me from facing new challenges or working out of my comfort zone.  I think I partially have anxiety BECAUSE of what I do.  I enjoyed doing what I do at first...but now my occupation is such a hassle. 

On a side note, my mother had mild anxiety, so I do believe this can be genetically passed down.
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Offline anxiousartist

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Re: Great anxiety story in The Atlantic
« Reply #11 on: January 13, 2014, 01:03:10 PM »
Am so glad you called attention to the article. Now you even agree re the womb issue and divorce matter. The circumstances during my womb time were so bad I emerged knowing I did not want to be born or live. As to divorce, I've lost many an attempt to argue that much needs to be done to preserve a marriage once there is a child.

Of course now I must get the book. It is on order in the library. For now I'm still reading (no, studying) the article.

The reason I never married or had children is because I don't want my children to go through the same things I went through growing up with step-parents. If I ever have kids, it would have to be in a solid relationship that has a good chance of lasting.

I actually think it's OK to use drugs like he used drugs to get through highly anxiety provoking situations. Knowing you have something that works really reduces anticapatory anxiety. The problem is when you start using drugs every day. If you use drugs every day, the drugs don't work when you really need them to work so you have to take more.

Ironically, doctors love prescribing SSRI's that have never worked for me, but they hate prescribing benzo's. I currently have a prescription for clonazepam, and I'm supposed to take it every day, but I only take it for high anxiety provoking situations, but I'm not going to tell the doctor that.

I would probably be better off with a benzo like xanax that's more powerful and shorter acting, but I'm reluctant to tell a doctor how I take them.
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I'm working on being happy with what I can do, rather than sad for what I cannot do

Offline Doxie Lover

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Re: Great anxiety story in The Atlantic
« Reply #12 on: January 13, 2014, 06:52:15 PM »
Am so glad you called attention to the article. Now you even agree re the womb issue and divorce matter. The circumstances during my womb time were so bad I emerged knowing I did not want to be born or live. As to divorce, I've lost many an attempt to argue that much needs to be done to preserve a marriage once there is a child.

Of course now I must get the book. It is on order in the library. For now I'm still reading (no, studying) the article.

The reason I never married or had children is because I don't want my children to go through the same things I went through growing up with step-parents. If I ever have kids, it would have to be in a solid relationship that has a good chance of lasting.

I actually think it's OK to use drugs like he used drugs to get through highly anxiety provoking situations. Knowing you have something that works really reduces anticapatory anxiety. The problem is when you start using drugs every day. If you use drugs every day, the drugs don't work when you really need them to work so you have to take more.

Ironically, doctors love prescribing SSRI's that have never worked for me, but they hate prescribing benzo's. I currently have a prescription for clonazepam, and I'm supposed to take it every day, but I only take it for high anxiety provoking situations, but I'm not going to tell the doctor that.

I would probably be better off with a benzo like xanax that's more powerful and shorter acting, but I'm reluctant to tell a doctor how I take them.

Xanax is like an elephant tranquilizer for me....I can't function at all on it.  I take Ativan for panic attacks...and for sleeping.
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Online tinam7

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Re: Great anxiety story in The Atlantic
« Reply #13 on: January 15, 2014, 08:07:09 AM »
He presents a lengthy, detailed report on meds. We can do what is best for us, use our own judgment. I look to CBT which he hardly mentions. Also meditate he mentions only once and no mention of exercise.

In the last part he does a bit of an about turn. Anxiety has its merit, he claims, can be good for us, be stimulating, help us to achieve. He achieved plenty but it was no pleasure trip. It is fascinating to get such insight from a person who has been plagued all his life. One way or another, there is hope.
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Offline Doxie Lover

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Re: Great anxiety story in The Atlantic
« Reply #14 on: January 18, 2014, 09:56:57 PM »
He presents a lengthy, detailed report on meds. We can do what is best for us, use our own judgment. I look to CBT which he hardly mentions. Also meditate he mentions only once and no mention of exercise.

In the last part he does a bit of an about turn. Anxiety has its merit, he claims, can be good for us, be stimulating, help us to achieve. He achieved plenty but it was no pleasure trip. It is fascinating to get such insight from a person who has been plagued all his life. One way or another, there is hope.

Yeah, he was not treating his anxiety in a way I'd want to:  balancing alcohol and heavy duty sedatives is dangerous...he's lucky he's alive.
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