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Author Topic: free workbooks information for panic/depression/anxiety/CBT forms  (Read 22148 times)

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Offline ekoworld

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Re: free workbooks information for panic/depression/anxiety/CBT forms
« Reply #10 on: August 20, 2011, 05:25:49 PM »
Hi I am posting the free claire weekes audio site again as for some reason it didnt seem to make its way in here and there are some other relaxion audios on here also. so here is the link again.

http://www.junior-anxiety-depression-exchange.org.uk/relax.html
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“Our anxiety does not empty tomorrow of its sorrow, but only empties today of its strength”

Offline ekoworld

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Re: free workbooks information for panic/depression/anxiety/CBT forms
« Reply #11 on: August 20, 2011, 06:24:29 PM »
12 yoga poses to help reduce anxiety


1. Controlled Breathing

This is a great way to start your practice. Sit in a seated, cross-legged position. Lengthen your spine as you inhale, and as you exhale place your hands on your knees, palms facing up. Take a moment to think about the intention of your practice and relax into the seated position.

On your next inhale, breathe in deeply to a slow count of four, but don’t exhale just yet. Hold your breath for four counts, then exhale for a slow count of eight. Repeat this controlled breathing for up to a full minute to calm your mind.

2. Downward Facing Dog

Come onto your hands and knees, and on your next inhale, straighten your legs, so your body forms an inverted V. Let gravity pull your heels toward the ground, and leave your neck in a neutral position.

Relax into this posture, letting gravity release built up tension in your neck and the backs of your legs. You can hold downward dog for 10 deep breaths or up to five minutes! Start out with what’s comfortable for you, and work up to holding the pose for a bit longer as you practice more.


3. Extended Puppy

Move back to all fours, then walk your hands out in front of you and lower your chest toward the floor with your bottom still in the air. Rest your forehead on the floor, breathe, and relax. Feel the muscles lengthening along your spine and in your neck. Hold this for 10-15 deep breaths.



4. Standing Forward Bend

Another good pose for releasing tension in your back, neck, and shoulders, standing forward bend also helps you clear your mind. Stand up straight with your feet hip width apart and arms by your sides. As you inhale, raise your arms over your head, then “swan dive” forward, bending at the waist, until your body is folded in half.

Either place your hands on the floor or grasp your opposite elbows, and hang out here taking slow, deep breaths for up to a minute.

To come out of forward bend, roll your spine up, one vertebra at a time, lifting your head up last.

5. Half Moon Pose

Balancing is an excellent way to get anxious thoughts out of your head. As you find balance in your body, your mind will balance, too!

Start out with your legs about four feet apart. Place your left hand on your left hip, then bend to the right. Place your right palm on the floor a foot or two away from your right foot.

Now, slowly bring your left leg off of the floor and straighten your left arm toward the sky. You should now be balanced on your right arm and leg, with your left leg parallel to the floor and your left arm reaching toward the sky. Hold this posture for 10 deep breaths, then repeat on the left side.


6. Easy Pose

Sit on the floor with your legs crossed, resting your hands on your knees with the palms facing up. If you like, you can let your thumbs touch your pointer fingers or just leave your fingers neutral.

Sit with your back straight and breathe, focusing on deep inhalations and exhalations. You can stay in easy pose for as long as you like. If you’re feeling extra tension, try adding some neck and shoulder rolls to this posture.


7. Seated Forward Bend

Sit up straight on the floor with your legs out in front of you, feet touching. Flex your feet, pulling your toes toward your body and your heels off of the floor. Inhale, and raise your arms over your head, then exhale and stretch forward with your arms.

Grab on wherever you can reach — thighs, knees, calves, or feet — and rest in that position for 10-12 deep breaths. Let your head relax and feel the tension release from your neck.

8. Camel Pose

This backward bend helps release tension in the front of your body. Begin sitting on your knees, then lift your bottom off of your heels, so your thighs are perpendicular to the floor.

Place your palms on your lower back for support, then slowly bend backward, starting with your spine and finally releasing your head back. If you’re comfortable here, you can release your hands from your back and grab on to your heels to deepen the stretch.

To come out of the pose, place your hands back on your back, and slowly straighten your spine, lifting your head last.

9. Bridge Pose

To practice this simple inversion, start out on your back, drawing your feet toward your bottom, but keeping your heels on the floor. Grab on to your feet, then lift your bottom off of the floor.

The idea here is to have a straight line from your knees to your neck. Squeeze your bottom to lift up higher off of the floor. Hold this for 10 deep breaths, and then release.


10. Reclining Hero Pose

Start out seated on your knees, and gently move your knees and feet apart, so you can place your bottom on the floor. If you’re not able to do that, your body might not be ready for this pose. Respect your knees: don’t push it if it hurts!

If you can get into this position, slowly lean backward, coming on to your elbows. If you’re comfortable there, lower your body down. The deepest version of this posture is when your back is resting on the floor. Relax here for up to one minute, taking deep breaths.

11. Salutation Seal

Come to a seated, cross-legged position once again, with your back straight. Imagine a string going up your spine, pulling your head toward the sky. Now, bring your palms together into prayer position, and relax.

You can hold this pose for as long as you like. Try to clear your mind and focus on your breath.

12. Corpse Pose

Whether you did all of the poses above or just a few, this posture lets your body soak in the benefits from your practice.

Lay on your back with your feet hip distance apart and your arms by your sides. Focus your attention on your toes, imagining them letting go of any tension. Then, shift your focus to your feet and ankles, releasing any stress you’re holding there. Allow your awareness to move up your body, relaxing each part, ending by relaxing your neck, your face, and the top of your head. Stay here, enjoying total relaxation, for as long as you like. No one will judge if you happen to doze off for a bit!











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“Our anxiety does not empty tomorrow of its sorrow, but only empties today of its strength”

Offline ekoworld

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Re: free workbooks information for panic/depression/anxiety/CBT forms
« Reply #12 on: August 20, 2011, 09:37:45 PM »
14 ways to boost your stress glands




1.  Give the fast food a break. Usually loaded with neurotoxins like monosodium glutamate (MSG), fast food can cause your body to be in a constant state of stress after eating it and until the chemicals are detoxified from your system.  Depending on the strength of your liver’s detoxification systems that can be anywhere from a few hours to several days.

2.  Take a deep breath…and then, take a few more. Research shows that even a few minutes of deep breathing can have an impact on the adrenal glands by reducing the stress hormones they secrete.  Instead of jumping out of your seat during a traffic jam or other stressful spot, start breathing deeply.

3.  Reduce your stress. Ok, I know this sounds impossible to many people.  But the truth is that no one else is going to reduce your stress.  While life can be stressful sometimes, it’s important to take some time on a daily basis to release stress.  Go for a walk, stop and smell the roses (literally), give a loved one a hug, practice meditation, get some rest, or practice some other form of stress management.

4.  Eat plentiful amounts of fresh fruits and vegetables. Chronic stress depletes nutrients.  By eating a diet that is rich in nutrients from fresh fruit and vegetables, you’ll give your body the vitamins, minerals, and phytonutrients that help it recover.


5.  Reduce your caffeine intake. Caffeine stimulates the adrenal glands only to cause an energy crash later on.  Try herbal teas instead.  Peppermint tea is a natural pick-me-up that doesn’t stimulate the adrenal glands.

6.  Try to get at least 7 or 8 hours of sleep at night. And if possible, don’t wake to a blaring alarm clock since the noise causes a flood of stress hormones to be released.

7.  Practice the yoga posture Viparita Karani. For those of you who don’t speak Sanskrit (myself included) that means “legs up the wall.”  While keeping your legs up the wall, elevate your pelvis on a bolster or folded blankets.  According to yoga expert, Roger Cole: “If the legs tire of being straight, bend the knees and cross the legs, with knees near the wall.”  According to Cole, “This pose stimulates baroreceptors (blood pressure sensors) in the neck and upper chest, triggering reflexes that reduce nerve input into the adrenal glands, slow the heart rate, slow the brain waves, relax blood vessels, and reduce the amount of norepinephrine circulating in the bloodstream.”

8.  Exercise regularly but don’t overdo. Exercise is a valuable release for pent-up stresses.  Just know your limits and don’t overexercise, since it can cause stress on the adrenals.

9.  Take some vitamin C. The adrenal glands use more vitamin C than any other organ or gland in the body.  Vitamin C is essential to manufacture adrenal gland hormones.  So, when you’ve been chronically stressed, your adrenals may have depleted your vitamin C stores.  A typical dose to assist with adrenal stress is 500 to 2000 mg or higher– higher doses may be necessary in extreme cases.  Of course, a qualified health professional should be consulted when using higher doses or before beginning any new supplements.


10.  Take some extra vitamin B-5, or pantothenic acid, as its also known.  Pantothenic acid is necessary for adrenal gland health.  While it is naturally present in the adrenal glands, it can become depleted as hormones are manufactured in response to stress.  A common dose for adrenal fatigue is 1500 mg but should always accompany a B-complex vitamin since these nutrients work synergistically.

11.  Avoid sugar and refined wheat products. They cause your blood sugar to fluctuate rapidly, which in turn causes your adrenals to overreact.

12.  Eat some protein at every meal to  stabilize blood sugar and prevent strain on the adrenals.  That doesn’t necessarily mean meat.  Some good vegetarian sources of protein include:  legumes (beans), nuts, seeds, avocado, and quinoa (a delicious whole grain).

13.  Supplement with Siberian ginseng. Depending on how serious your adrenal stress may be you may also benefit from herbal support from eleutherococcus senticosus as it is also known.  It works primarily on the pituitary gland in the brain to better regulate adrenal gland function.  In adrenal fatigue, communication between the pituitary gland and the adrenals may be impaired.  A typical dose of Siberian ginseng for the treatment of adrenal fatigue is 100 to 200 mg daily.

14.  Take a page from Ayurveda—the Indian form of natural medicine with a several-thousand-year-old history.  Practitioners of Ayurvedic medicine recommend ashwagandha, or withania somnifera as it is also known.  Ashwagandha is a tonic for fatigue and exhaustion, memory loss, muscle weakness, and other symptoms of adrenal fatigue.  It can normalize adrenal gland hormones.  One to two teaspoons of an ashwagandha tincture daily is the commonly recommended dose.  Always consult your physician prior to use.


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“Our anxiety does not empty tomorrow of its sorrow, but only empties today of its strength”

Offline ekoworld

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Re: free workbooks information for panic/depression/anxiety/CBT forms
« Reply #13 on: August 20, 2011, 09:50:07 PM »

How do you know if your adrenal glands are overworked?  Here are 24 signs:

1. Allergies
2. Anxiety or Irritability
3. Arthritis
4. Cravings for salty and/or sweet foods
5. Depression
6. Excessive hunger
7. Extreme fatigue, exhaustion, or chronic fatigue
8. Eyes are sensitive to light
9. Feeling overwhelmed or unable to cope with life’s stresses
10. Frequently experience colds, flu, or other infections
11. Insomnia
12. Irritable bowel syndrome, IBS
13. Low blood pressure
14. Low libido
15. Low stamina
16. Menopause symptoms like hot flashes, mood swings, vaginal dryness
17. Poor concentration
18. Poor digestion
19. Premenstrual syndrome (PMS)
20. Reduced immune function
21. Reduced memory
22. Sensitivity to cold
23. Sleep does not refresh or revitalize you
24. Slow to recover from illness or injuries

These symptoms can also be signs of other health conditions so you should always consult your doctor if you suspect any health issues.  And, of course, you don’t need to be experiencing all of the above symptoms to be suffering from adrenal fatigue.



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“Our anxiety does not empty tomorrow of its sorrow, but only empties today of its strength”

Offline jen2213

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Re: free workbooks information for panic/depression/anxiety/CBT forms
« Reply #14 on: August 23, 2011, 04:44:53 AM »
Nice info!! I have done yoga 2 times in the last 4 days and have been feeling really great!
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I have CDO, it's like OCD, but all the letters are in alphabetical order, as they should be!!

Offline ekoworld

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Re: free workbooks information for panic/depression/anxiety/CBT forms
« Reply #15 on: August 23, 2011, 06:13:53 PM »
YEAH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! JEN!!!!!!!!!!!awesome as much as I surf the net I find so much info for any of us just about anything postive and not harmful is worth a try will be posting more soon.
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“Our anxiety does not empty tomorrow of its sorrow, but only empties today of its strength”

Offline AbbeyB

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Re: free workbooks information for panic/depression/anxiety/CBT forms
« Reply #16 on: August 28, 2013, 10:35:05 PM »
Module #5 hit the nail on the head for me.  Very helpful.
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Offline raerae

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Re: free workbooks information for panic/depression/anxiety/CBT forms
« Reply #17 on: October 12, 2013, 01:16:06 AM »
Thank you sooooo much. I'll try these out and best of hope that they help me get my life back.


Here are some free printable CBT forms am also posting in Panic disorders forum and Medications and therapy hope they are useful there are quite a few of them.

http://www.get.gg/freedownloads2.htm
this workbook is free and is a PDF file for download which you can save to your computer,if you dont have PDF veiwer that best one I know is adobe and it is free,I checked out some of this but not all hope it can be helpful to some.

This link goes straight to the pdf file workbook

 http://www.presence-awareness.com/uploads/COGNITIVEMINDFULNESSWORKBOOK13.pdf
Found this through my searches and hope it can be useful for some,it is a PDF file if you dont have a PDF veiwer might try the adobe download that is free also and you can either print the workbook to your comp or save it to your computer


http://portal.unesco.org/en/files/25197/11080250281Workbook2003_Anxiety.pdf/Workbook2003_Anxiety.pdf

http://www.calipso.co.uk/downloads/Workbooks/worksheets_overcominganxiety_depression.pdf
this is a 19 page workbook with many worksheets this is in pdf format if you do not have a pdf viewer adobe offers one for free
this is a free downloadable more simplified 28 pg workbook it is in pdf format if you do not have a pdf veiwer you can download one from adobe.

http://www.bradfordvts.co.uk/ONLINERESOURCES/NORTHUMBRIA%20SELF%20HELP%20WORKBOOKS/panic.pdf
This is a free downloadable/printable depression workbook that also contains worksheets it is in pdf format if you dont have a pdf veiwer adobe offers one for free.

heres the link

http://www.bradfordvts.co.uk/ONLINERESOURCES/NORTHUMBRIA%20SELF%20HELP%20WORKBOOKS/depression%20%26%20low%20mood.pdf
these are 9 differnet modules to help with depression

they are in pdf format so if you dont have a pdf veiwer adobe offers theres for free for download

module 1 link-- overview of depression

http://www.cci.health.wa.gov.au/docs/BB-1-Overview.pdf

module 2 link-- behavorial stratigies for managing depression

http://www.cci.health.wa.gov.au/docs/ACFB003.pdf

module 3 link--the thinking and feeling connection

http://www.cci.health.wa.gov.au/docs/BB-3-The%20Thinking-Feeling%20Connection.pdf

module 4 link--the ABC analysis

http://www.cci.health.wa.gov.au/docs/BB-4-The%20ABC%20Analysis.pdf

Module 5 link--unhelpful thinking styles

http://www.cci.health.wa.gov.au/docs/BB-5-Unhelpful%20Thinking%20Styles.pdf

Module 6 link--detective work and disputation

http://www.cci.health.wa.gov.au/docs/BB-6-Detective%20Work%20and%20Disputation.pdf

Module 7 link--the end result

http://www.cci.health.wa.gov.au/docs/BB-7-The%20End%20Result.pdf

Module 8 link--core beliefs

http://www.cci.health.wa.gov.au/docs/BB-8-Core%20Beliefs.pdf

Module 9 link--self managment

http://www.cci.health.wa.gov.au/docs/BB-9-Self-Management.pdf

hope it can help some people
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Offline Catastrophe

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Re: free workbooks information for panic/depression/anxiety/CBT forms
« Reply #18 on: May 04, 2014, 10:58:45 AM »
Thank you so much <3 :) I just bookmarked this thread :) Would you mind if I posted these on another forum I post in? :)
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Offline AncientMelody

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Re: free workbooks information for panic/depression/anxiety/CBT forms
« Reply #19 on: September 11, 2014, 10:35:42 AM »
I like the Centre for Clinical Interventions website. They have some excellent CBT tools for insomnia, anxiety, depression. Very basic language so a person can use it alone if need be, but could also be shared during therapy sessions. I've used some of the worksheets myself and print off copies for my patients all the time as well.
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